10/12/22

2022 Nursing History Symposium – Nov 8

2022 NURSING HISTORY SYMPOSIUM

November 8, 2022 at 9:30 am PT
at the Cecil Green Park House, UBC-V Campus

Public Health and Pandemic Caring in Context

($10 admission – lunch will be served) and online via Zoom (free)*

with Dr. Esyllt Jones, University of Manitoba

Pandemic Caring: public health nursing and community in the history of infectious disease

The 1918-19 influenza pandemic demonstrated the power of nursing in a disease crisis. At the time, and later in the eyes of historians, nursing interventions were valued because they alleviated suffering and meant an increased chance of survival when there few medical treatment options. Much of this nursing care was delivered outside of formal hospital settings, in locales that blurred the boundaries between institution, community, and home. In local neighbourhoods, public health nursing and private nursing organizations had for decades served those with virtually no access to health care, in places where infectious disease was a constant risk and a leading cause of mortality and disability. This form of nursing – in homes, at mission houses, for private agencies such as the VON – played a role historically that we barely recognize today, when the face of pandemic nursing is that of critical care.

Historical resonances nonetheless abound. Public health leaders are now calling for a return to community and neighbourhood-level engagement and health care investment, partly in response to pandemic inequality and vaccine access. This paper will draw from historical analyses of community-level nursing in the past, and suggest ways in which nursing might engage with those success and failures.

Dr. Esyllt W. Jones is a professor of history at the University of Manitoba. Her research interests include history of health, public health and pandemic history. She is the author of Influenza 1918: Disease, Death and Struggle in Winnipeg, and co-editor of the recently published Medicare’s Histories: Origins, Omissions and Opportunities in Canada (2022).

PROGRAM

9.30    Registration and refreshments
10.00  Opening Remarks –

Dr. Elizabeth Saewyc, Professor and Director

Dr. Geertje Boschma, Professor
Reflecting on the Legacy of Helen Shore

10.20    Keynote with Dr. Esyllt Jones | discussion
11.15    Break

11.45    Panel discussion with:
Dr. Susan Duncan, Professor, School of Nursing, University of Victoria
Dr. Sonya Grypma, Adjunct Professor, School of Nursing, UBC-V

Dr. Alison Phinney, Professor, School of Nursing, UBC-V
Dr. Mariko Sakamoto, Alzheimer Society of Canada Postdoctoral Fellow,

School of Social Work, UBC
12.45    Closing remarks

12.50    Lunch

 

REGISTER : https://nursing.ubc.ca/events/2022/nursing-history-symposium

 

*A ZOOM LINK WILL BE SENT TO ALL PARTICIPANTS ONE DAY BEFORE THE EVENT
If you registered “in person” but find you are not able to attend at Cecil Green Park on November 8, you are welcome to attend online. The event will be recorded for those unable to attend at all.

 

 

05/12/22

Helen Shore Nursing History Endowment

Helen Shore Nursing History Endowment, May 12, 2022

We are pleased to announce the establishment of the Helen Shore Nursing History Endowment in the UBC-V School of Nursing. The fund will support nursing history scholarship, research and initiatives in alignment with the goals of the UBC Consortium for Nursing History Inquiry. Professor Emerita Helen Shore, who passed away in 2020, was an alumna (BSN ’61, MA in education ’71), a faculty member from 1965 to 1990, and a longstanding friend of the UBC-V School of Nursing. She is the late Patron of the Consortium, which she generously supported since its early beginnings. We are greatly indebted to Helen Shore.

04/13/22

Teaching Nursing History with Photographs

The video recording of “Teaching Nursing History with Photographs” presented at the 2021 ICN Congress, is now available in UBC’s library Open Collection at the following link: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/81060

http://hdl.handle.net/2429/81060

Presented by nursing history scholars Helen Vandenberg, Sandra Harrisson, Maria Eugenia Galiana-Sanchez, Cecilia Sironi, Lydia Wytenbroek, Anna La Torre, and Geertje Boschma, representing the Canadian Association for the History of Nursing and the European Association for the History of Nursing at the International Council of Nursing Congress, November 2, 2021

Description

Teaching nursing history through photographs: between realities, cultural constructions and social idealisations. Countless images of nurses have been captured on camera, but what do they tell us about nursing’s past? This symposium examines historic photographs of nurses at various periods in history and from a range of social and national contexts in Europe and Canada. The purpose is to show how the analysis and interpretation of an image may form a way to gain a deeper understanding of nurses’ critical role in maintaining people’s health. Secondly, we demonstrate how photographs can be used as an intriguing educational strategy to teach nursing history. In a panel presentation with a brief discussion period, we will present and explain a series of historical photographs, either as slides or within a short video, and applying multiple analytic lenses, including gender, race, religion, nation and place. What determines an adequate and critical representation of nursing’s past?

 

01/5/22

COVID in Long Term Care Event – save the date – be invited

Subject: SAVE THIS DATE!!! COVID in Long Term Care Event

A message from Megan Davies:

Dear Project Supporters, Friends, Colleagues, and Family,

A project that I have been putting my heart into for the last six months is nearly ready to go.  This will be one of the first public commemorations of the pandemic in Canada. It looks at the mass deaths and the extended isolation of our seniors in long-term care facilities, but also at longstanding problems in the eldercare system. It calls for radical, care-centred change.

On January 14, 2022 the COVID in the House of Old project will become public with an online launch and a new website featuring a powerful storytelling exhibit, a haunting audio-visual representation of aggregate death stats, and a podcast that is also cooler than me.  Beginning in the spring, a series of in-person exhibits will take place at BC’s Kwantlen Polytechnic University, local libraries, community centres and educational spaces. Funding is being sought to take CIHO across the country

The EventBrite Invitation below allows you to register for the zoom event.  Please sent it on to all your friends and networks and share on social media. I particularly want to engage seniors and caregivers, though of course this relates to all of our future selves. It is a major concern of our time.

The virtual launch on 14 January at 1-2 pm PST. This event will be hosted by Simon Fraser University, where a Shadbolt Fellowship that has made this project possible.

 

COVID in the House of Old – Virtual Launch and Artist Talk – 14 January 2022

https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/covid-in-the-house-of-old-virtual-launch-and-artist-talk-tickets-221659929817

[If clicking the link does not work, copy the link into your browser/search line in a new tab]

The project website https://covidinthehouseofold.ca/ will include the entire exhibit, the podcast, and educational materials. It will go live January 14. Project email for further information: info@covidinthehouseofold.ca

Thanking you for your support and hoping you will make it on the 14th,

Megan Davies

 

Professor Megan J. Davies

Health & Society Program

Department of Social Science

York University

Canada

her/she

I live and work on the traditional territory of many Indigenous Nations. York University is on the area known as Tkaronto has been taken care of by the Anishinabek Nation, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, the Wendat, and the Métis. Hornby Island lies in the traditional territory of the K’ómoks First Nation. In both places I do my best to live by the terms of the Great Lakes region’s Dish With One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant, a wise agreement that honours equitable, healthful, and sustaining life for all beings.

12/6/20

Helen Shore, Associate Professor Emerita and Patron of the Consortium dies at age 95

On Tuesday, November 3rd in the evening, Associate Professor Emerita Helen Shore passed away at the age of 95. She was an alumna (BSN ’61, MA in education, ’71), a faculty member (1965-1990), and a longstanding friend of the School of Nursing.

Helen was proud of sharing common ancestry with Florence Nightingale, and of being the daughter of pioneering health professionals in Alberta. She began her own nursing career in 1946 with an RN diploma from Vancouver General Hospital, and over the years she emerged as an influential nurse leader in Vancouver, especially in public health nursing. Helen was a strong advocate for nursing’s voice in policy, raising awareness of nursing’s important roles in addressing public health problems.

As a member of our faculty for 25 years, she was actively involved in curriculum development for both the undergraduate and graduate programs. Even after her retirement in 1990, Helen remained dedicated to the School: she helped establish an internal research award in public health nursing, and contributed funding for nursing history scholarship. In 2013, she generously supported the launch of the Consortium for Nursing History Inquiry in the UBC School of Nursing, and remained actively engaged as the Consortium’s patron.

Her achievements have been recognized by many awards throughout her career, including: a Merit Award for Excellence in Teaching (1975); the Nursing Division’s Distinguished Alumnae Award (1990); the UBC School of Nursing Partnership Award (2013); the UBC Faculty of Applied Science centennial Dean’s Medal (2015); and the UBC School of Nursing Centenary Medal (2019).

We deeply appreciated her enthusiastic interest in our School and her commitment to our profession. She was an ardent advocate of public health nursing and strongly committed to nursing history. Her role as Patron of the Consortium of Nursing History Inquiry was highly valued. We will miss her.

 

10/3/20

A special issue on the history of nursing education

Quality Advancement in Nursing Education/Avancées en formation infirmière [QANE-AFI]

Congratulations to the journal of the Canadian Association for Schools of Nursing for a special issue on the history of nursing education:

The History of Nursing Education | L’histoire de la formation en sciences infirmières

With guest-editors:

Dr. Sioban Nelson, University of Toronto and Dr. Pauline Paul, University of Alberta

Nelson, Sioban and Paul, Pauline (2020) “The History of Nursing Education | L’histoire de la formation en sciences infirmières,” Quality Advancement in Nursing Education – Avancées en formation infirmière: Vol. 6: Iss. 2, Article 1.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17483/2368-6669.1267

Visit the journal’s website for a full view of the special issue! [https://qane-afi.casn.ca/journal/vol6/iss2/1/]

02/6/20

Nursing History Symposium 2021

 

Nursing Artifacts and Nurses’ Uniforms: Preserving Nurses’ Cultural History

A Symposium in Honor of the BC History of Nursing Society’s 30th Anniversary

Date: 23 Nov 2021

Presented by: Keynote Speaker: Christina Bates, former curator of the Canadian Museum of History and author of A Cultural History of the Nurse’s Uniform

ONLINE: Webinar/Zoom

Time: 12.00 noon – 1.30 pm

Please register via the School of Nursing – events website: https://nursing.ubc.ca/news-events/events

https://nursing.ubc.ca/news-events/events/04-oct-2021/nursing-artifacts-and-nurses-uniforms-preserving-nurses-cultural

 

Schedule of Events

12:00: Welcome and Opening Remarks by

  • Kathy Murphy, President, BC History of Nursing Society
  • Geertje Boschma, Professor, UBC School of Nursing

12:10: Keynote Address by Christina (Tina) Bates, former curator of the Canadian Museum of History, Ottawa

          “Nursing History Embodied: Collecting and Researching a Uniform Collection”

  • Tina Bates will present the Canadian History Collection of 1,800 artifacts, with a focus on its 52 uniforms from nursing schools across Canada. She will demonstrate material culture methods that can tease out meaning from artifacts. Based on her book, A Cultural History of the Nurse’s Uniform, she will examine the role of the uniform in creating nursing identity over one hundred years. The uniform was an active participant in the changing culture of nursing work and thought.
  • Following the presentation, there will be time for discussion with the audience.

 

12:45: Fashion Show of Nurses’ Uniforms

  • Facilitated by the members of the BC History of Nursing Society

Closing Remarks by Kathy Murphy and Geertje Boschma