Justin’s Module 2 resources: #1 & #2

  1. In the Eyes of Mala

On the Government of Canada website, under the teaching resources, you will find a pdf document called, “In the Eyes of Mala.” This document demonstrates a series of lesson plans built around a 12-year-old Inuk boy who lives in Salluit, Nunavik, for students aged 9-12 years old. The unit will provide some insight into the lives of Inuit, where students will learn about the history, culture and traditions of Inuit. When completed the booklet, students will be able to: express an appreciation for strong traditions and unique culture of the Inuit people, describe the various developments that affected Canada’s Artic from its early history to the present, locate the community of Salluit and its neighbouring Inuit municipalities on a map of Canada, and relate the similarities and differences between life in Salluit and life in their own community.

Here is the pdf: CLICK ME

In addition to this, I wanted to include a webpage that will help introduce the topic of the Inuit.

Here is the webpage: CLICK ME

  1. Stained Glass Window in Parliament: Commemorating the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools

Residential schools were government-sponsored religious schools established to assimilate Indigenous children into Euro-Canadian culture. They were originally established in 1880 and the last one closed in 1996. Personally, I have a hard time teaching about this topic because it is something I’m not proud of, and something that I do not want my kids to think was okay. I’ve used this video to introduce residential schools to my students, which can be found on “The Canadian Encyclopedia” webpage.

After introducing the video, I had an elderly man from the community come in to talk about their experience with residential schools and how it affected his family. After each story, Jackie (the elderly man) would attach some sort of art activity. Since we were learning about colours and shades in Art class, Jackie suggested that he would teach a lesson on stained glass, as there is a glass window in parliament commemorating the legacy of residential schools. Here is the 4 page brochure issued by the Government of Canada: CLICK ME

Hopefully this resource can provide you an introductory lesson to teach in your classrooms. I felt better using government issued resources at first, because it has been written and developed with Indigenous perspective in mind.

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