The BC Research Libraries Group is proud to present

Rick Lugg

President, Sustainable Collection Services

who will be speaking about

Rethinking Library Resources:

The Role of Local Print Collections in a Digital Age

Vancouver

March 6, 2014, 1:00-3:00p.m.

Earl & Jennie Lohn Policy Room (Rm. 7000),

SFU Harbour Centre (webcast available for this session only)

  • Coffee and refreshments will be served at 1:00 p.m., with the talk beginning at 1:30 p.m.
  • Be sure to arrive early for some mingling, and feel free to socialize after the talk as well.

——————————–AND———————————–

Victoria

March 7, 2014, 1:30-3:30p.m.

Haro Room, Cadboro Commons

University of Victoria

  • Coffee and refreshments will be served at 1:30 p.m., with the talk beginning at 2:00 p.m.
  • Be sure to arrive early for some mingling, and feel free to socialize after the talk as well.

 

 

Library shelves are increasingly full, and print books are still being acquired. Yet surprisingly few are being used. In 2011, a study of OhioLINK’s 88 libraries and 30 million monograph volumes showed that 6% of those books accounted for 80% of circulations. In October 2010, Cornell reported that 55% of its books had not circulated since 1990. Meanwhile, library administrators seek to expand space for group study, information commons, and writing centers. Much of the available space is currently occupied by low-use print collections, stored and maintained at an estimated annual cost of $4.26 per volume in open stacks, $.86 per volume in high-density storage. For these reasons, print collections face increased scrutiny.

This session will focus on three aspects of this challenge:

The Changing Value of Local Print Collections: changing user preferences; usage of print collections; shelving and floor space; lifecycle management costs.

Alternatives to Local Print Collections: collection integrity & security; the “collective collection”; archival copies, service copies and surplus copies; Hathi Trust; shared print initiatives (WEST, CRL, MI-SPI, Maine Shared Collection Strategy and others); and independent action in a collective context.

Managing Down Local Collections: making the case; coordinated deselection; efficient storage & withdrawal; analytical tools and deselection metadata; disposition options.

The intent of this session is to explore why rethinking print collections is a reasonable idea at this time, and how management of print collections might be adapted while assuring archival security and continued access for users.

About the Speaker:

Additional background information can be found on two blogs:

Sample & Hold: Rick Lugg’s Blog http://sampleandhold-r2.blogspot.com/ Most recent topic: “Shared Print Monographs: The Question of Scale”

SCS Insight: News & Comment on Data-Driven Deselection: http://sustainablecollections.com/weed-feed/ Most recent topic: “Talking with Faculty About Library Collections (Revisited)”

Logistics

For those attending in Victoria, the easiest parking is available in Lot 5, accessed off Sinclair Road (which continues MacKenzie). Refer to the following map: http://www.uvic.ca/home/about/campus-info/maps/maps/com.php

For those attending in Vancouver, parking and public transit info for SFU Harbour Centre is available here: http://www.sfu.ca/mecs/harbour+centre/location.html

 

{ 0 comments }

The BC Research Libraries Group is proud to present

Denise Koufogiannakis MA, MLIS, PhD

Collections & Acquisitions Coordinator, University of Alberta Libraries

who will be speaking about

Evidence based library and information practice

Vancouver

February 7, 2014, 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Lillooet Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia

  • View the archived webcast: HERE

The need for academic libraries to seek out evidence for decision-making around collections and services has always existed, but is there a way we can do this better? Join Denise Koufogiannakis, Collections & Acquisitions Librarian at the University of Alberta Libraries, who will share insights into evidence-based library and information practice both from a philosophical as well as practical approach. She draws on experiences from many years involvement with evidence based practice, as well as the research she conducted for her PhD in Information Studies from Aberystwyth University in Wales, UK.

About the Speaker:

Denise Koufogiannakis is the Collections & Acquisitions Librarian at the University of Alberta where she manages activities associated with the Libraries’ acquisition of print and electronic materials and represents the Libraries through various consortia. Her main research interest is evidence based library and information practice (EBLIP), a field in which she has published extensively. Her other professional interests include open access, publishing, and new collection formats. She is the founding editor, and currently Associate Editor of the open access journal Evidence Based Library and Information Practice.

{ 0 comments }

The BC Research Libraries Group is proud to present

Philip Kent

**ARCHIVED WEBCAST**

University Librarian, University of Melbourne

who will be speaking about

Challenges for the Research Library in the 21st Century

 Vancouver

September 20 2013, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Dodson Room [Room 302], Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia

 

What are the challenges for the library in serving a research-intensive university in the 21st century? Join innovator Philip Kent, University Librarian at the University of Melbourne, who will share insights gleaned from leading university libraries around the world. He will also draw on his experience leading the library at the University of Melbourne, which consistently appears as the highest scoring Australian university in international rankings.

 

About the Speaker:

Philip G Kent is the University Librarian at The University of Melbourne. He commenced at the University in March 2009following an extensive career in universities and CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency. Philip joined Melbourne at an important time. Following the Information Futures Commission and the development of a 10 year information strategy for the University, the Library is being reinvigorated under his leadership. Its history as a repository of vital research and cultural collections remains central to the role of the Library. A number of significant cultural collections including the University Archives, the largest non-government archive in Australia and the Grainger Museum also fall under Philip’s leadership. In addition the Library is developing innovative learning spaces to support the Learning and Teaching strategies of the University as well as providing appropriate technologies to support student learning. Melbourne has a prestigious pedigree as one of Australia’s top research universities. Consequently Library support for the University’s research, e-research and e-scholarship, research training and research data management agendas is a high priority.

 

 

 

{ 0 comments }

The BC Research Libraries Group is proud to present

Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Director of Scholarly Communication at the Modern Language Association and Professor of Media Studies at Pomona College, in Claremont, California

who will be speaking about

Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy

***Archived webcast***

 

Vancouver

Thursday, October 4, 2012, 9:30 – 11:00am,

UBC, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Chapman Learning Commons, Dodson Room (rm. 302)

Register here: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/4359529470

***Doors open at 9:00am for coffee and refreshments prior to the presentation***

BCRLG gratefully acknowledges COPPUL sponsorship for funding live webcast of this talk to registered COPPUL libraries

COPPUL Live webcast registration: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/4493444012

Live webcast instructions will be sent to registrants.

Victoria

Friday, October 5, 2012: 10:00 a.m.

UVic, McPherson Library, Room 210

Register here: http://bit.ly/PfKp9p

***Doors open at 9:30 am for coffee and refreshments prior to the presentation***

——-

 Abstract: Academic institutions are facing a crisis in scholarly publishing at multiple levels: presses are stressed as never before, library budgets are squeezed, faculty are having difficulty publishing their work, and promotion and tenure committees are facing a range of new ways of working without a clear sense of how to understand and evaluate them. Planned Obsolescence is both a provocation to think more broadly about the academy’s future and an argument for re-conceiving that future in more communally-oriented ways. Facing these issues head-on, Kathleen Fitzpatrick focuses on the technological changes– especially greater utilization of internet publication technologies, including digital archives, social networking tools, and multimedia–necessary to allow academic publishing to thrive into the future. But she goes further, insisting that the key issues that must be addressed are social and institutional in origin. Confronting a change-averse academy, she insists that before we can successfully change the systems through which we disseminate research, scholars must re-evaluate their ways of working–how they research, write, and review–while administrators must reconsider the purposes of publishing and the role it plays within the university. Springing from original research as well as Fitzpatrick’s own hands-on experiments in new modes of scholarly communication through MediaCommons, the digital scholarly network she co-founded, her talk explores all of these aspects of scholarly work, as well as issues surrounding the preservation of digital scholarship and the place of publishing within the structure of the contemporary university.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Kathleen Fitzpatrick is Director of Scholarly Communication at the Modern Language Association, and is on leave from a position as Professor of Media Studies at Pomona College, in Claremont, California. She is the author of Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy , which was published by NYU Press in November 2011; Planned Obsolescence was released in draft form for open peer review in fall 2009. She is also the author of The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television, published in 2006 by Vanderbilt University Press (and of course available in print), and she is co-founder of the digital scholarly network MediaCommons. She has published articles and notes in journals including the Journal of Electronic Publishing, PMLA, Contemporary Literature, and Cinema Journal.

For more information about the Lecture series see http://blogs.ubc.ca/bcrlglectures/ or contact BCLRG Lecture Series Coordinators:

Joy Kirchner (joy.kirchner@ubc.ca), Tracie Smith (tracies@uvic.ca), Don Taylor (dtaylor@sfu.ca), Lynn Copeland (Lynn.Copeland@unbc.ca)

 

{ 0 comments }

The BC Research Libraries Group is proud to present

Mike Ridley

Former Chief Information Officer (CIO) and Chief Librarian at the University of Guelph

who will be speaking about

 Bring It On!

Why the Crisis in Academic Librarianship is the Best Thing Ever and What We Should Do About It.

***Archived webcast***

=====

  Vancouver

Thursday, Sept. 6, 2012, 9:30 – 11:30am,

SFU Vancouver, Room 2270, Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings Street

 RSVP: [link to booking system]

***Doors open at 9:00am for coffee and refreshments prior to the presentation start at 9:30am***

Victoria

Friday, Sept. 7, 2012, 9:30 – 12 noon,
University of Victoria, Room 210, McPherson Library

 RSVP: [link to booking system]

***Doors open at 9:30 am for coffee and refreshments prior to the presentation start at 10:00am***

—–

Abstract: There is a crisis in academic librarianship. Or so we are being told. Frankly, I’m delighted. This is happening not a moment too soon. While there are some significant challenges in our field, the real looming crisis is that we might not grasp the tremendous opportunity before us. It’s time to escape the echo chamber and break out of the filter bubble. Our universities are at a critical stage of transformation. The challenges they face are exactly the issues academic librarians can respond to: learning outcomes, learning objectives, research productivity, self-directed learning, research accountability, critical thinking, technology leadership, and more.

Let’s forego the orthodoxies; let’s call a truce in the turf wars. Instead let’s reaffirm the values that guide us, the expertise we have, and the strategies necessary to lead organizational transformation. There has never been a more exciting time to be an academic librarian.

About the Speaker:

Until January 2012, Mike Ridley was the Chief Information Officer (CIO) and Chief Librarian at the University of Guelph. Currently, on sabbatical, he is writing a book on literacy, completing a graduate degree in higher education, editing Access (the magazine of the Ontario Library Association), teaching, and consulting with a number of professional organizations.

He has been a professional librarian since 1979 working at a variety of positions at the University of Guelph, the Health Sciences Library at McMaster University, and the University of Waterloo. In 1995 he returned to the University of Guelph as the Chief Librarian and in 2004 was named the CIO.

Ridley has served as the President of the Canadian Association for Information Science, President of the Ontario Library Association, and Chair of the Ontario Council of University Libraries. He has been a member of the Board of the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN),and the Canadian University Council of CIOs (CUCCIO) and is currently serving on the Board of Directors of the Ontario Research and Innovation Optical Network (ORION) and the Board of Governors of the University of Guelph.

He blogs at MichaelRidley.ca and can be found on Twitter @mridley. Mike is a failed rock star.

For more information about the Lecture series see http://blogs.ubc.ca/bcrlglectures/ or contact BCLRG Lecture Series Coordinators:

Nancy Black (blackn@unbc.ca), Joy Kirchner (joy.kirchner@ubc.ca), Tracie Smith (tracies@uvic.ca),

Don Taylor (dtaylor@sfu.ca)

{ 0 comments }

 The BC Research Libraries Group is proud to present:

 

Caroline Haythornthwaite

Louise Spiteri

Director, School of Library, Archival & Information Studies

University of British Columbia

 

Director of the School of Information Management

Dalhousie University

Speaking about…

Breathing new life into the profession: LIS education in the 21st Century

***Archived webcast***

=======

Wednesday, June 27, 2012: 10:00-12:00pm

The Dodson Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver

 Registration: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/3680829460

***Coffee and refreshments will be served prior to the presentation beginning 9:30am***

 Libraries and library roles are undergoing rapid transformation in the 21stcentury. In the face of such enormous change, some libraries are choosing non-library trained professionals to fill key new roles. Others are looking to non-library professional programs to help train library professionals in new roles. While others are demanding library education change immediately to meet the demands for new skill sets required for new library positions. Two innovative esteemed Canadian Library School Directors will speak to the many challenges facing library and information professional programs in preparing library and information professionals for 21st century roles.

About the Speakers:

 Dr. Haythornthwaite is Director of the School of Library, Archival & Information Studies, the iSchool at the University of British Columbia (UBC). Prior to coming to UBC in 2010, Dr. Haythornthwaite was Professor, Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In 2009-10 she was the Leverhulme Trust Visiting Professor, Institute of Education, University of London. Dr. Haythornthwaite was among the first to apply social network analysis to the study of online communities and online learning, and she has produced seminal work in these areas. Her research examines how the Internet and computer media support and affect work, learning, and social interaction, with a focus on how information and knowledge is shared through social networks, and collaborative practices are facilitated and extended through information technologies. Her studies have examined social networks of work and media use, the development and nature of community online, distributed knowledge processes, the nature and constraints of interdisciplinary collaboration, and the transformative effects of the Internet and web 2.0 technologies on learning and collaborative practices. She has written extensively on the Internet, online social networks, and online learning (e-learning). Major publications include The Internet in Everyday Life (Blackwell, 2002, with Barry Wellman); Learning, Culture and Community in Online Education: Research and Practice (Lang, 2004, with Michelle M. Kazmer), a special issue of the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication on Computer-Mediated Collaborative Practices and Systems (2005), and the Handbook of E-learning Research (Sage, 2007, with Richard Andrews). Her latest book, E-learning Research and Practice (Sage, 2011, co-authored with Richard Andrews) particularly addresses the way learning is changing with the Internet and social media.

Dr. Spiteri is the Director of the School of Information Management (SIM) at Dalhousie University. She received a BA and MA in Canadian History from York University, a MLIS from the University of Western Ontario, and a BEd (History and French) and a PhD (Information Studies) from the University of Toronto. She joined SIM as a faculty member in 1998.  Dr. Spiteri received teaching awards from Wayne State University and Dalhousie University, and has served as the Academic Director of the MLIS program at SIM from May 1st 2009 to June 30th 2010.

Dr. Spiteri teaches in the areas of the organization of information, including records management, cataloguing and classification, and indexing, and conducts research in social discovery systems, classification theory, thesaurus construction, and cataloguing. Dr. Spiteri’s research has been presented at national and international academic and professional conferences.  She was amongst the first scholars to examine the impact of social tagging systems and folksonomies on the integration of user-based language into subject analysis systems.  Dr. Spiteri is conducting seminal and highly-cited research into the potential for social discovery tools to transform the library catalogue into an online, collaborative, and virtual experience of walking through the library’s stacks. Dr. Spiteri is actively involved in several academic, professional, and not-for-profit associations, and sits on the editorial boards of a number of peer-reviewed journals.

For more information about the Lecture series, contact BCLRG Lecture Series Coordinators:

Nancy Black (blackn@unbc.ca), Joy Kirchner (joy.kirchner@ubc.ca), Tracie Smith (tracies@uvic.ca), Don Taylor (dtaylor@sfu.ca)

{ 0 comments }

The BC Research Libraries Group is proud to present:

“I absolutely love that room – whatever it’s called.”
Student Interpretations of the Library as Place

Amanda Wakaruk, MLIS, MES
Government Documents Librarian

University of Alberta

***Archived webcast***

Vancouver
Wednesday, March 2, 2011
9:30-11:00am
Room 2270, Harbour Centre Building, 515 West Hastings
SFU Vancouver

Victoria
Thursday, March 3, 2011

10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

Room 210, McPherson Library

University of Victoria

Successful academic libraries are happening places… but what is actually happening in them? This session will examine the social construction of academic libraries as interpreted through the experiences of its users. Amanda’s research, informed by approaches developed in phenomenological psychology and environment-behaviour studies, explores the evolving role of physical libraries, their conception as “place”, and environment-behaviour aspects of the library user experience. Drawing on data gathered through semi-structured interviews, observational seating sweeps, and stories about memorable library experiences, the results of this project will help us consider the future of the library as place.

About the Speaker:

Amanda Wakaruk is the Government Documents Librarian at the University of Alberta Libraries. A graduate of SLIS (1999), Amanda returned to the UofA in 2009 after working at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia and York University in Toronto, Ontario. Motivated by “end of libraries” rhetoric, she completed a Master’s Degree in Environmental Studies (York, 2009) in an attempt to apply place studies research to the academic library experience.

Vancouver

Wednesday, March 2, 2011
9:30-11:00am
Room 2270, Harbour Centre Building, 515 West Hastings
SFU Vancouver

{ 0 comments }

Have you considered: What if We Closed the Library?

We are pleased to announce that our next speaker in the BCRLG Lecture Series will be Amanda Wakaruk of the University of Alberta.

Amanda will share her thoughts on this question and more in this presentation of her research findings and current thinking on the Library as Space.  Not to be missed!

Photo credit: The Radical Patron

For a sneak preview of Amanda’s investigations, check out her article published in C&RL News, January 2009.



{ 0 comments }

Navigating the Internet for Learning Purposes:
Why some novices are more successful than others

Malinda Desjarlais, PhD

Assistant Professor
University of Northern British Columbia,
Psychology Department

***Archived webcast ***
BCLA Browser report

Victoria
Wednesday, December 1, 2010
1 pm – 2:30 pm
McPherson Library, Room 210
University of Victoria

Vancouver
Thursday, December 2, 2010
2 pm – 3:30 pm
Room 2270, Saunder Industries Policy Room
SFU Harbour Front Centre

Dr. Desjarlais investigates factors that influence decision-making when novices navigate the Internet for learning and information seeking purposes. In exploring learner and task characteristics she considers prior knowledge, motivation, self-regulatory skills, attentional control, and short-term memory capacity and assesses how these factors act as supports for novices when learning from the Internet. These characteristics are analyzed through pre-and post-testing, interviewing and by tracking learners’ gaze during navigation. The use of an eyetracker has revealed differences in the selection of and attention to information within a webpage, variability in information navigation characteristics, and shifts in navigation strategies. She has extended this research by exploring differences in novices’ Internet navigations related to achievement. Her presentation will be of interest to researchers and practitioners interested in Internet learning, information seeking behavior research, and imposed query searching.

About the Speaker:
Malinda Desjarlais has a PhD in Psychology from Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario and is an Assistant Professor in the Psychology Department at the University of Northern British Columbia. Her research area is in the field of human development with strong interests in cognitive development.

For more information, contact BCLRG Lecture Series Coordinators:

Nancy E. Black (blackn@unbc.ca ), Joy Kirchner (joy.kirchner@ubc.ca), Kat McGrath (kat.mcgrath@ubc.ca),  Tracie Smith (tracies@uvic.ca), Don Taylor (dtaylor@sfu.ca)

{ 0 comments }

The BC Research Libraries Group is proud to present

G. Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean for Library Digital Programs and
Hodson Director of the Digital Research and Curation Center
Johns Hopkins University

***Archived webcast***
BCLA Browser report

—–

The Case for Open Data and eScience – Establishing a University Data Management Program at Johns Hopkins

Joint BCRLG/ Open Access Week Keynote Event

Friday, October 22nd, 9:30-11:00am

Dodson Room,
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver
-and-
Live Webcast at University of British Columbia, Okanagan, Room UNC 334

Faculty at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) associated with community-wide eScience projects identified data curation as one of the most important repository-related services. In response, Johns Hopkins University established a university data management program and a service model to support data curation as part of an evolving cyberinfrastructure featuring open, modular components. In addition to this technological framework, Johns Hopkins is developing new roles and relationships between the library and the academic community, most notably through the development of “data scientists” or “data humanists.” These developments reflect the realization that the IR is the first step in a longer journey and that for institutional efforts to be successful, they must be integrated into a larger landscape of repositories that serve a distributed and diverse academic community. Sayeed Choudhury will discuss these developments at JHU and how these developments support the case for open data and the longer term vision for data management.

About the Speaker:

G. Sayeed Choudhury is the Associate Dean for Library Digital Programs and Hodson Director of the Digital Research and Curation Center at the Sheridan Libraries of Johns Hopkins University. He is also the Director of Operations for the Institute of Data Intensive Engineering and Science (IDIES) based at Johns Hopkins. He is a Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science at Johns Hopkins, a Research Fellow at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a Senior Presidential Fellow with the Council on Library and Information Resources. He is a member of the ICPSR Council, DuraSpace Board and the Digital Library Federation advisory committee.

Choudhury serves as principal investigator for projects funded through the National Science Foundation, Institute of Museum and Library Services, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. He is the Principal Investigator for the Data Conservancy, one of the awards through NSF’s DataNet program. He has oversight for the digital library activities and services provided by the Sheridan Libraries at Johns Hopkins University. Choudhury has published articles in journals such as the International Journal of Digital Curation, D-Lib, the Journal of Digital Information, First Monday, and Library Trends. He has served on committees for the Digital Curation Conference, Open Repositories, Joint Conference on Digital Libraries, and Web-Wise. He has presented at various conferences including Educause, CNI, DLF, ALA, ACRL, and international venues including IFLA, the Kanazawa Information Technology Roundtable and eResearch Australasia.

For more information about the Lecture series  or contact BCLRG Lecture Series Coordinators:

Joy Kirchner (joy.kirchner@ubc.ca), Kat McGrath (kat.mcgrath@ubc.ca), Don Taylor (dtaylor@sfu.ca), Tracie Smith (tracies@uvic.ca)

The BC Research Libraries Group is proud to present

G. Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean for Library Digital Programs and Hodson Director of the Digital Research and Curation Center

Johns Hopkins University

 
who will be speaking about 

The Case for Open Data and eScience – Establishing a University Data Management Program at Johns Hopkins

This event is a joint BCRLG/ Open Access Week Keynote Event

(This event will be live in Vancouver and live webcasted in Victoria, UNBC, UBC Okanagan)

Friday, October 22nd, 9:30-11:00am
Dodson Room,
 Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia and 
Live Webcast at UBC Okanagan, room UNC 334
 

{ 0 comments }