Psych 417A: From a visitor to part of a community

Us With the Globe

Students Samantha Montgomery (Left) and Jasmine Roh (Right)

By Jasmine Roh and Samantha Montgomery

WHO, WHAT, WHERE and WHY?

Having to sum up the experience of Psych 417A proves to be a difficult job as our words may not do real justice to how much we’ve actually seen, learned and experienced through the class itself and the 3-month internship. Continue reading

East Asians and Depression

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By Rowena Kong

The difference in rates of depression between East Asians and North Americans has long attracted research which led to many possible explanations for such findings. According to a summary study by Weissman et al. (1996) which analysed the rates of major depressive disorder in different countries based on community surveys,the prevalence rate of Taiwan stood low at 1.5% for every 100 people while that of Korea was a close 2.9%. Continue reading

Psych 417A Blog: Where the journey begins…

By Li (Leigh) Chu

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Leigh with her placement partner Sarah, and students at the Good Samaritan School for the Deaf

I guess my journey started back in the November of 2014 when I finally signed up for the course “Psychology and Developing Societies” and the International Service Learning (ISL) program. Like many of my peers (or maybe you?), I was quite unsure about my future, especially in terms of how my psychology degree would play a role in my future career. Continue reading

Introducing a new PSYC 417A blog series!

Photo credit: Dorcas Lee

Photo credit: Dorcas Lee

By Dr. Sunaina Assanand and Benjamin Cheung

An important goal of education is the application of knowledge to social change. Typically, however, students are presented with limited opportunities to contribute to social change over the course of their education. For the past three years, UBC’s Psychology Department has offered an International Service Learning course that empowers students to act as agents of social change. Continue reading

Tweet Your Knowledge

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By Benjamin Cheung

Imagine – you’re walking with a friend on the street when, suddenly, a wild spider appears! Your friend, who has arachnophobia, screams at the spider. It wasn’t very effective. The spider stands its ground, staring back at your friend, whose heart rate increases, palms get sweaty, and pupils dilate.

If you weren’t a psychology student, the story might end with either a callous laugh from you, or some empathetic comforting. Continue reading

Want to do something good for your health? Try being generous

By Ashley Whillans, University of British Columbia

Every day, we are confronted with choices about how to spend our money. Whether it’s thinking about picking up the tab at a group lunch or when a charity calls asking for a donation, we are faced with the decision to behave generously or not.

Continue reading

Intuition and Science – Can they agree?

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By Rowena Kong

In the realm of science, we ask questions to seek answers and in order to obtain answers, we go through the structured, systematic and sometimes considerably lengthy process of research planning, design, experiment implementation, data collection, analysis of results and further thought-generating discussions to arrive at a supported conclusion of our starting hypothesis. Continue reading

Tears and Emotion: A Mystery Unsolved?

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By Rowena Kong

Why do people cry? Sadness does not seem to be the only emotion which stimulates a person to shed tears. We cry when we listen to soothing music and loving words spoken to us. We may even cry when we are extremely overjoyed. In Vingerhoets and Bylsma (2015) review of human emotional crying, the authors listed both the negative and positive antecedents of adult crying and they included defeat, powerlessness, failure, justice and altruism. Continue reading