Module 2 – Post 3 – Technology Helping Create Original Aboriginal Art by Kevin Andrews

Under the mentorship of Ken McNeil and utilizing the latest design and fabrication technology, UBC is working with local First Nations to carve out wood/cedar ‘story panels’.  Using modern scanning and CNC router technology, unique limited edition prints and panels are produced to promote the cultural connection between the artist and the cedar. For many of these artists, the panel design and the technology used allows for a greater means of expression producing a ‘self-portrait’ of the designer. Aboriginal art is an estimated $2-billion market worldwide, but only for a few select, high-end artists, with galleries making the majority of the money through the hops is the training and application of computer-assisted machining technologies will lead to added wealth for the artists and First Nations communities. The panels, which are functional works of art, take hours to complete and are one-of-a-kind.

For many of these artists, the panel design and the technology used allows for a greater means of expression producing a ‘self-portrait’ of the designer. Aboriginal art is an estimated $2-billion market worldwide, but only for a few select, high-end artists, with galleries making the majority of the money, though the hope is the training and application of computer-assisted machining technologies will lead to added wealth for the artists and First Nations communities. The panels, which are functional works of art, take hours to complete and are one-of-a-kind.

 

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