Module 2 posts

Toward an Indigenous Feminine Animation Aesthetic

While not discussing digital storytelling, this article does articulate many of the themes I’m interested in exploring in my final project: raising political consciousness of Indigenous rights, drawing attention to how mainstream media works to “naturalize” imperialism, and the digital realm as a dynamic communication network that bolsters tribal political, cultural, and spiritual sovereignty.

Indigenous Digital Storytelling in Video: Witnessing with Alma Desjarlais

This article discusses how Indigenous digital storytelling in video tells the story of what has happened and is happening in the lives and work of Indigenous peoples. Alma Desjarlais is an Indigenous Elder who shares her stories to help people understand the histories and strength of Indigenous peoples.

Grandmothers of the Metis Nation

The above link shows the trailer for the film, Grandmothers of the Metis Nation. The film shares stories of Metis grandmothers to demonstrate the roles and responsibilities of Metis women in the past and today. One of the grandmothers is Alma Desjarlais (from the article above), who explains the roles of grandmothers as educators and healers in their communities.

Narrating Aboriginality On-Line: Digital Storytelling, Identity and Healing

Healing the wounds of “colonial contagion” is a process that’s articulated through the spoken and written words of Aboriginal writers. Indigenous digital stories present counter-narratives to the Canadian settler state to give voices to otherwise silences experiences of the effects of colonization.It focuses on therapeutic possibilities of digital storytelling and warns of limiting the healing potential to simply matters of cultural assertion. It also discusses the limits of digital storytelling and how some individuals and communities may not have the resources to participate in digital storytelling.

Media Portrayals of Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women

This article summarizes the differences in Canadian local press coverage of missing or murdered Aboriginal women and white women. It discusses stereotypes that make Aboriginal victims less likely to be covered in news stories and the idea that victims are divided into stereotypes of “pure” women who are newsworthy victims and fallen women who are not (aka “missing White woman syndrome”).

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