Module 4 Contributions – Indigenous Peoples and Mining

Here again, a compilation of useful websites that address different perspectives on indigenous peoples and mining.

http://www.idlenomore.ca/
I should have posted this website way earlier. Idle No More calls on all people to join in a peaceful revolution, to honour Indigenous sovereignty, and to protect the land and water.  Idle No More has quickly become one of the largest Indigenous mass movements in Canadian history – sparking hundreds of teach-ins, rallies, and protests across Turtle Island and beyond. What began as a series of teach-ins throughout Saskatchewan to protest impending parliamentary bills that will erode Indigenous sovereignty and environmental protections, has now changed the social and political landscape of Canada.

www.culturalsurvival.org
Good website with lots of resources. Cultural Survival advocates for Indigenous Peoples rights and supports Indigenous communities’ self-determination, cultures and political resilience, since 1972. This organization has worked with Indigenous communities in Asia, Africa, South America, North America, and Australia, becoming the leading US-based organization defending the rights of Indigenous Peoples around the world.
Cultural Survival envisions a future that respects and honours Indigenous Peoples inherent rights and dynamic cultures, deeply and richly interwoven in lands, languages, spiritual traditions, and artistic expression, rooted in self-determination and self-governance.

http://www.fairmining.ca/fair-mining-code/
Another good website with lots of resources.  Fair Mining Collaborative joins with First Nations people and local communities in British Columbia in the quest to shape the future for families, land, water, and wildlife. Fair Mining Collaborative provides technical and practical assistance around the issues and impacts of mining. They spend time in communities to provide two-way knowledge sharing for strengthening local capacity to manage the full spectrum of mining concerns: mapping traditional resource inventories and raising awareness of social impacts; staking, permitting, exploration; and operation, closure and reclamation.

http://www.iied.org/mining-dialogues
IIED (International Institute for Environment and Development) is a policy and action research organisation, that promote sustainable development to improve livelihoods and protect the environments on which these livelihoods are built. They specialise in linking local priorities to global challenges. IIED is based in London and works in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East and the Pacific, with some of the world’s most vulnerable people. IIED’s dialogue programme for artisanal and small-scale mining enables a wide range of stakeholders to come together and collaborate on empowering miners, improving governance and delivering a safer, more secure working environment.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Swy0boCxEgY
Indigenous Peoples and the Sustainable Development Goals, a short video from the United Nations. They asked indigenous representatives at a recent United Nations forum why the Global Goals matter. I included this one because it present original voices in the topic of sustainability.

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