About

Rising sea levels and increased frequency and severity of extreme weather events due to climate change, damage coastal buildings, infrastructures, and beaches, impacting municipalities, First Nations, and Provincial and Federal governments. In order to implement mitigation and adaptation strategies, Natural Resources Canada has provided generous support to the Living Breakwaters project to develop a layered approach to coastal adaptation that incorporates living systems and enhances local and regional ecosystems and spatial quality while reducing flood/erosion risks and vulnerabilities caused by sea level rise.

The Living Breakwaters project is at once broad and specific in its approach to coastal adaptation. Within this multi-scale and multi-sectoral approach, the project has two main objectives: to advance the adaptation knowledge and to develop solutions for the erosion of the Point Grey cliffs.

 

Projects

Erosion of the Point Grey Cliffs: Causes and Adaptation Pathways

The Point Grey cliffs and its beaches have been eroding with an increased rate due to changing environmental and climatic conditions and human-activities. Erosion of the cliffs poses increased risks to social and cultural assets such as the local species, natural features, and stories attached to specific locations, as well as to physical assets such as infrastructure and buildings.

This project investigates the coastal mechanisms that contribute to the erosion of the cliffs by developing a local wave and sediment model.

More information…


Erosion of the Point Grey cliffs threatens important infrastructure and buildings at UBC.

The project aims to develop a clear and holistic framework of the erosion problem at the Point Grey cliffs, both gathering and integrating existing information and contributing with innovative ideas that might open new approaches for dealing with erosion. It develops four concepts to tackle the cliff erosion and analyses their feasibility from a technical, environmental, economical, legislative and social perspective.

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The Point Grey cliffs are ecologically, culturally and socially significant for the Musqueam First Nation and the visitors and residents of the Greater Vancouver region.

This project surveys and document the existing ecological conditions of the Point Grey Cliffs by undertaking a field survey of the three and shrub species, and vegetation densities along the five transects at different locations of the Point Grey Cliffs.

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Coastal Adaptation Platform

 

 

 

 

 

Link to the Platform:


Nature-based Coastal Protection Projects in British Columbia

 

 

More information…


Indigenous Coastal Adaptation Practices

 

 

 

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Low Embodied Energy ‘Habitat Blocks’

 

 

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The Historical Aerial Photography Study of Greater Vancouver

Today, with 75% of the population located in the southwest corner of the province, The Greater Vancouver  region is the most densely populated area of British Columbia. Situated in glacial lowlands that is streaked and defined by the Fraser River, and westwards enclosed by its estuary and the coastline, the general vulnerability of the area to extreme weather events is evident and characterizes the historical coastal transformations of the region.

The project compiles and systematizes graphical data to help visualize key transformative processes in the Greater Vancouver region and it highlights  how close the heavily urbanized the region is intertwined with, and dependent on, its marine and river environment.

More information…

Team

Prof. Kees Lokman

Project lead

School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

University of British Columbia

klokman@sala.ubc.ca

 


Dr. Tugce Conger

Assistant project manager

University of British Columbia

tconger@mail.ubc.ca

 

 

 

 

COLLABORATORS

Doug Doyle

Associate Director, Municipal Engineering

University of British Columbia

Doug.Doyle@ubc.ca

Collaborated projects:

      • Erosion of the Point Grey Cliffs: Causes and Adaptation Pathways
      • Feasibility of the Preliminary Erosion Protection Concepts
      • Site Documentation & Plant Geography
      • The Historical Aerial Photography Study of Greater Vancouver

David Gill

Program and Policy Planner

University of British Columbia

David.Gill@ubc.ca

Collaborated projects:

      • Erosion of the Point Grey Cliffs: Causes and Adaptation Pathways
      • Feasibility of the Preliminary Erosion Protection Concepts
      • Site Documentation & Plant Geography
      • The Historical Aerial Photography Study of Greater Vancouver

Daan Rijks

Project Development

Royal Boskalis Westminster N.V.

daan.rijks@boskalis.com

Collaborated projects:

      • Erosion of the Point Grey Cliffs: Causes and Adaptation Pathways
      • Feasibility of the Preliminary Erosion Protection Concepts

Dr. Nina Hewitt

Instructor, Department of Geography

University of British Columbia

nina.hewitt@ubc.ca

Collaborated projects:

      • Site Documentation & Plant Geography

 


Amir Taleghani

Water Resources Engineer

Kerr Wood Leidal

ATaleghani@kwl.ca

Collaborated projects:

      • Erosion of the Point Grey Cliffs: Causes and Adaptation Pathways
      • Feasibility of the Preliminary Erosion Protection Concepts

Prof. Joe Dahmen

School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

University of British Columbia

jdahmen@sala.ubc.ca

Collaborated projects:

      • Low Embodied Energy ‘Habitat Blocks’

Sara Muir-Owen

UBC Program Manager

Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions

sara.muir-owen@ubc.ca

Collaborated projects:

      • Coastal adaptation platform

DG Blair

Executive Director

Stewardship Centre for British Columbia

Green Shores

stewardshipcentre@gmail.com

Collaborated projects:

      • Coastal Adaptation Platform
      • Nature-Based Coastal Protection Projects in British Columbia

 

STUDENTS

Rens Harteveld

Masters Student, TU Delft

Project: Erosion of the Point Grey Cliffs: Causes and Adaptation Pathways

Calvin Tan

Masters Student, University of British Columbia

Project: Coastal Adaptation Platform

Irene Cantoni

Masters Student, TU Delft

Project: Feasibility of the Preliminary Erosion Protection Concepts

Camilla Gaido

Masters Student, TU Delft

Project: Feasibility of the Preliminary Erosion Protection Concepts

Tessa Jonker 

Masters Student, TU Delft

Project: Feasibility of the Preliminary Erosion Protection Concepts

Laurie van Gijzen

Masters Student, TU Delft

Project: Feasibility of the Preliminary Erosion Protection Concepts

Karen Tomkins

Masters Student, University of British Columbia

Project: Indigenous Coastal Adaptation Practices

Benham Harper

Masters Student, University of British Columbia

Project: Lower Mainland Hazards, Risks, ad Vulnerability Mapping

Gabriela Garcia

B.A., Freie Universität Berlin

Project: The Historical Aerial Photography Study of Greater Vancouver

Collaborations

We collaborate with academic teams/departments, organizations, companies, and different government levels. These collaborations are formed in many different ways including sharing ideas and data, conducting research, developing strategies, and engaging with stakeholders.

Some of the collaborators include:

           

Contact

We strongly encourage you to contact us with any questions, suggestions, and collaboration ideas.

You can reach us by email at livingbreakwatersproject@gmail.com

Thank you.