Mapping Bicycle Accidents in Greater Vancouver

PLEASE NOTE THIS POST HAS NOW BEEN ARCHIVED AND UPDATED CONTENT CAN BE FOUND ON MY NEW BLOG HERE:

http://healthycitymaps.blogspot.ca/2014/05/Historic-bicycle-accidents.html

I found some very interesting open data a few days ago and I decided I had to map it. I have also been experimenting a lot over the past year with the kernal density functions of ArcGIS and with using deep zoom to map very detailed local data across large geographic areas. Click on the map to zoom right in and see streets with labels…I hope you enjoy playing with this!

This map was intended to be a first step in unpacking this data, and I am planning on creating a series of maps that will show all five years of data in sequence. I also have some preliminary summary charts that break this data down by year, by month, and by all cities in British Columbia. If you like you could subscribe to this blog to keep informed.

Please leave a comment below or send me a message on twitter to let me know what you think about this maps design, the accident data itself or using zoom.it as a map viewing platform. Let’s have a conversation about what has been done over the past five years and what still needs to be don’t to make Vancouver a safer city for cyclists like you and me!

This entry was posted in Analysis, Cycling, Data Visualization, GIS, Interactive, Maps, Personal. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Mapping Bicycle Accidents in Greater Vancouver

  1. What this says to me is that “accidents” only happen at intersections. Of course I love the bike lanes, but it seems to me that dollar-for-dollar the city would do better to improve intersection design. Nobody gets knocked off while travelling straight along?

    Does anyone know how to turn left from Beatty on to Dunsmuir or vice versa? How many conflict points are there? What’s wrong with this sort of design: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlApbxLz6pA

    Medium term I’d prefer roundabouts and zebra crossings too. I see a lot of pedestrians running to “catch” the crossing signal. That’s dangerous. Better to have slow, continuous, pedestrian-aware cars: cross when you’re ready, pedestrians.

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