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    Dear Café Scientifiquers,

     

    Our next café will happen on Tuesday January 31st, 7:30PM at the Railway Club. The speaker for the evening will be Simon Donner, an Assistant Professor in the UBC Department of Geography who is interested in why the climate matters. His talk will be on:

     

    Beyond Nemo: Coral reefs in a warming world

     

    Coral reefs, often called the rainforests of the ocean, are thought to be more sensitive to climate change than any other ecosystem on the planet. Drawing on his research in the Central Equatorial Pacific nation of Kiribati, Simon Donner will talk about the effects of changes in climate and ocean chemistry on tropical corals and the potential for adaptation.

     

    We hope to see you there!

     

    – Café Scientifique Vancouver Organizers

    Dear Café Scientifiquers,

     

    Our next café will happen on Tuesday November 29th, 7:30PM at the Railway Club. The speaker for the evening will be Dr. Richard Moore, a scientist at the world-renowned Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre. His talk will be on:

     

    Cancer Metagenomics: Microbes and Cancer

     

    Greater than 20% of all cancers are known to be caused by microbes (viruses and bacteria) including cervical cancer, liver cancer and gastric cancer. I will describe how we are using the latest sequencing technologies to discover novel associations between microbes and cancer. I will highlight our recent discovery of Fusobactium nucleatum overabundance in colorectal cancer.

     

    For a news piece on the team led by Richard and their recent discovery, check out http://www.genomebc.ca/media/news-releases/2011/bc-researchers-investigate-link-between-cancers-and-viruses/

     

    We hope to see you there!

     

    Sam Lee & Carolina Chanis

    Café Scientifique Vancouver Organizers

    Dear Café Scientifiquers,

     

    Our next café will happen on Tuesday October 25th, 7:30PM at the Railway Club, and the speaker for the evening will be Jenna Capyk (PhD candidate from UBC’s Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department). Her talk will be on:

     

    Tuberculosis and Cholesterol: Growth of a biochemical field

     

    Tuberculosis may be an ancient disease, but it is also one that still represents a major global health concern. With about 1/3 of all people carrying the Mycobacterium tuberculosis, bacterium that causes TB, and drug resistance becoming a more serious problem every year, research into this bacterium has intensified over the past decade. Our knowledge of exactly what factors allow the bacteria to survive and cause disease, however, is very limited. A discovery made a few years ago has opened doors to a new research field on cholesterol degradation by M. tuberculosis. I’d like to talk about my biochemical research into how and why this bacterium uses cholesterol, and how this work fits into our understanding of the bacterium and the disease. I would also like to put this work in the context of research community building a new field, and use it as an example to explore the limitations and progression of biochemical research.

     

    We hope to see you there!

     

    – Your Café Sci Vancouver Organizers

    Posted on behalf of Anadi Canepa, President of ARPICO:

    Dear Cafe Scientifique Vancouver,

    It is my pleasure to join the Board of Directors to announce the incorporation of the Society of Italian Researchers and Professionals in Western Canada (ARPICO).

    The Society is non-profit and was founded by a group of researchers and professionals in Vancouver, British Columbia on January 17th, 2011. The aim of ARPICO is to provide a receptive atmosphere for debating new ideas, encourage and support networking, and becoming a beacon to local and visiting researchers, scholars and professionals of Italian descent or having an interest in the Italian arts and sciences. To this aim the Society adds its commitment to promote, advance, and protect the Italian culture.

    We would be honored if You would join ARPICO (www.arpico.org).

    I cordially invite You to the next Café Scientifique:

     “Greenest City Conservation Project: about engaging citizens in climate change issues”

     

    Dr. J. Robinson, professor with UBC’s Institute for Resources, Environment & Sustainability, and the Department of Geography; executive Director of the UBC Sustainability Initiative.

     

    Roundhouse Community Arts & Recreation Centre

    181 Roundhouse Mews, Vancouver, BC V6Z 2W3

    October 27th, 8:30 PM

    See ARPICO Cafe poster attachment for more details.

    Check out the Life Sciences Cafe Sci!

    Part I of the “Seeing is Believing” series

    Please RSVP to nvohra@mail.ubc.ca by November 14, 2011

    Dear Café Scientifiquers,

     

    Our next café will happen on Tuesday September 27 at the Railway Club (579 Dunsmuir Street) at 7:30pm. Our speaker that evening will be Erika Eliason, an expert on Pacific salmon migration who has been featured on the UBC Public Affairs webpage. Her talk that evening will be:

     

    Pacific Salmon and Climate Change

    Every year, millions of Pacific salmon return from the ocean to the Fraser River to perform their upriver, adult spawning migration. Pacific salmon typically return to spawn in the same stream where they were born. This has resulted in many geographically and genetically distinct populations. In recent years, warm river temperatures have been associated with high mortality during the upriver spawning migration, raising clear conservation concerns. My research is focused on understanding why salmon die when the water gets too warm and how different populations vary in their susceptibility to warm temperatures.

     

    We hope to see you there!

     

    -Your Café Sci Vancouver Organizers (http://blogs.ubc.ca/cafesci/)

    Dear Café Scientifiquers,

    Our next café will happen on Tuesday Aug 30th, 7:30pm at the Railway Club (579 Dunsmuir St). We will be hosting Jacquelyn Cragg and Ward Plunet from the International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD), and their topic will be:

     

    From headlines to reality: How to be a smart consumer of scientific knowledge

     

    We are bombarded with the latest discoveries from science … a cure for cancer? A cure for spinal cord injury? A cure for obesity? This talk will allow you to analyze science with a new, critical lens. We will discuss the role of the media in portraying scientific findings, the politics of research, and a few aspects of evidence based medicine. Join us for a lively discussion!

    We hope to see you there!

    – Your Café Sci Vancouver Organizers

     

    Dear Café Scientifiquers,

     

    Our next café will happen on Tuesday July 26th, 7:30pm at the Railway Club (579 Dunsmuir St). We will be hosting Agatha Jassem, from the Department of Pathology at UBC, and her talk will be:

     

    Old Drugs, Bad Bugs: Antibiotic Treatment of Lung Infections in Cystic Fibrosis

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a fatal genetic disease that affects many Canadian children and young adults. Though CF is a multi-organ disease, chronic infection and inflammation of the lungs are particularly detrimental to health. Persons with CF can get infected with unusual bacteria that are hard to clear in part because they are, or become, highly resistant to antibiotics. Antibiotic treatment of airway infections in CF is further complicated by the fact that one class of antibiotics can cause resistance to another class, and some antibiotics can interfere with immune system processes. My research is focused on understanding how these “bad bugs” evade antibiotics, and the possible side-effects of chronic drug use.

     

    We hope to see you there!

     

    – Your Café Scientifique Organizers

     

    Dear Café Scientifiquers,

    Our next café will happen next Tuesday, June 28 at 7:30pm @ The Railway Club (579 Dunsmuir Street). That evening, we will host Gelareh Mazarei, a PhD Candidate at the Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics. Her talk that evening will be on Huntington’s disease:

    Solving the Mystery of Huntington’s disease

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating brain disorder that affects ~ 1 in 10,000 Canadians. Individuals with HD develop physical and mental disabilities that progress towards complete disability and eventual death. The part of the brain that predominantly gets affected in HD patients is the striatum, which controls our planning and abstract thinking. Currently, there are no treatments for HD due to the lack of understanding of the vulnerability of striatum in this debilitating brain disease. As a way to understand this, we study genes that get “turned on” only in the striatum, but nowhere else in the brain. We subsequently test these genes in a mouse model of HD to see if their ‘expression’ has changed . By knowing more about these newly described striatum-specific genes in this mouse model, we hope to open doors toward future therapies in HD.

    We hope to see you there!

    – Your Café Scientifique Vancouver Organizers

    Dear Café Scientifiquers,

    Our next session will happen on Tuesday May 31, 7:30pm @ The Railway Club. We will be presenting AJung Moon, a mechanical engineering researcher at UBC. Her talk will be:

    Roboethics – A discussion on how robots are impacting our society

     

    From vacuuming houses to befriending older persons at care facilities, robots are starting to provide convenient and efficient solutions at homes, hospitals, and schools. For decades, numerous works in science fiction have imaginatively warned us that robots can bring catastrophic ethical, legal, and social issues into our society. But is today’s robotics technology advanced enough to the point that we should take these fictional speculations seriously? Roboticists, philosophers, and policymakers agree that we won’t see Terminator or Transformers type robots any time soon, but they also agree that the technology is bringing forth ethical issues needing serious discussions today. In this talk, we will highlight some of the ways robots are already impacting our society, and how the study of human-robot interaction can help put ethics into its design.


    More more info on AJung, check out her website (http://profile.amoon.ca) and blog (http://www.RoboethicsDB.com)!

    We hope to see you there!

    – Your Café Scientifique Vancouver Organizers

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