Category Archives: Personal Profiles on MM Students

Alumnus Entry

First, thank you for inviting me to write a guest post on the official UBC Sauder MM Blog. It feels just like yesterday when you could find me sucking down double doubles from the Tim’s at Henry Angus at 7:30 AM each morning with incredible zeal, steeling myself for the day’s barrage of intense MM classes and dreaded group meetings – you know what I’m talking about.

In honesty, I look back on my days at Sauder with much fondness and believe that the MM program was a cornerstone decision that’s had a tremendous impact on my life.

I want to take this opportunity to offer a few words of advice and encouragement to those currently going through the program.

  1. Embrace your diversity in background, don’t shy from it.

I think many start the the MM program with a bit of self-doubt. I know in my year, we were only the third cohort coming out the program, so there was really a lot to think and be skeptical about. Wedged somewhere in between the rigorous academic foundation of a BCom and the work experience of an MBA, would I really be ready?

About half a decade out now, it’s very clear how little I had to fear. I still remember many of the stimulating conversations and incredible personalities from the MM program. I really enjoyed the dynamic natures of the people I went to class with, coming from various nationalities and academic backgrounds, who offered up perspectives on our courses and business cases with a perspective different from mine filtered from Science, Liberal Arts, Engineering backgrounds and more. Rarely in business is there only one way to tackle a problem, so learning to see so many different sides of an issue was a great lesson for me.


There have also been practical benefits to the MM experience. In the working world, now more than ever, creativity and new ideas are celebrated. At least in the technology and advertising world, many were fascinated by the story of my Music and Business background and often it’s kept the interviewer’s interest after they had slagged through 100 resumes with the same information, over and over. It shows we MMers have diverse interests, we’re willing to forge a unique path and if nothing else, that we’re interesting people (at least I’d like to think so). Breadth often breeds respect. I’ve noticed that stacking knowledge from different disciplines often enhances and rarely hinders your value to an organization.

  1. The UBC Sauder network is full of incredible connections. Use them.

One of the greatest things about being a graduate of UBC Sauder is that you’ll soon be joining the ranks of our amazing alumni community. A quick LinkedIn search will show you that we’re a global bunch, firmly established in almost every industry under the sun, whether in finance, tech, health, or entertainment – you’ll find us there..

Through the alumni network I’ve made many lifelong friends. I’ve found mentors to help me brainstorm through difficult business and career problems, I’ve secured job interviews while looking for new careers and I’ve found great friends and travel guides to meet up with when I’m visiting new countries, such as Tokyo, NYC and Seoul. Of course, I’ve also done my part to pay it forward when I can, helping make connections and introduction where possible. The reciprocity found in the Sauder community always surprises me and I’m grateful to be a contributing member.

  1. Life is a journey, don’t forget to enjoy the ride

The late nights, myriad exams and numerous networking and study sessions can seem incredibly arduous at times, but let me assure you that it will all be over in a blink of an eye. Very soon, you’ll be walking across a stage, shaking hands with the Chancellor in the Chan Centre and it will all feel like a dream.

So carpe diem. Will yourself to go to all the networking events, take part in the TREKs the school provides, make a few extra visits to the Career Centre, have a couple late nights out with your cohort and drink it all in (pun intended), leave no stone unturned because – to reiterate – it will all be over faster than you think. Say “yes” to more often than saying “no.” Make the most of your time in the MM program and leave no stone unturned. I assure you, it will be worth it.

All the best to this year’s MM cohort and a big shoutout to the amazing UBC Sauder alumni all around the world.

Feel free to connect with me whenever on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/leungalexander/ or read more about my travels, work and life at my blog leungalexander.com

Always willing to help a fellow MM-er in need.

 

Photo: Checking out the Angkor temples in Siem Reap, Cambodia


Written by Alexander Leung ’12

 

Good to Great

Yes, I’m going to borrow Jim Collins’ book title for the title of this blog post. And while it might sound cliché, I truly feel that the MM program took my career path, my personal life and my overall attitude and ambition from Good to Great.

Freshly graduated from the Faculty of Arts at UBC, before entering the MM program I was working as a bartender downtown Vancouver while deciding what my “real” job might be. I stumbled upon the MM program while researching UBC Law online, something I had imagined would always be on my post-graduate path. I am so happy that I chose the MM and Sauder.

The 9 months of MM were the most revolutionary in my adult life. Not only did I learn so much from the program courses and professors, but I also went through a major change in my personal life. I was so inspired by the energy, tenacity and drive of my fellow students that I knew I wanted to be around similar people in my professional and personal life. So much so, that Corey (a fellow MM student) and I started dating about half way through the program. We recently became engaged and have plans to marry in the summer of 2018.

Highlights of my time in the MM program include: our case study project on lululemon in Ann Stone’s marketing class, organizing events and social gatherings as part of the Student Exec, and delivering a successful pitch and business proposal as part of the CBP program.

I started working at L’Oreal only a few months after graduating from the MM program. I’m now coming up to my 5 year anniversary at the company, having worked on 2 brands across Western Canada. I would never have entered L’Oreal without the MM program and the help of the BCC. Thanks to them, I now feel more at home than ever at this organization and have my sights sets on a long career with the company.

I owe a huge thank you to all those around me in the MM community for your inspiration and setting me on this path! And to all current and future MM students, wishing you all the best, and hoping that you experience the same “Good to Great” transformation as me!

(Photo: Backcountry skiing with Corey, March 2017)

 

Written by Christine Frieght (Alumna)

How Sales Sold Me on Business

Flashback to 18 year old me: bright eyed, bushy tailed and hell-bent on pursuing a degree in psychology. Less than a year later, I was already disenchanted with that idea. When I began my undergraduate degree, I was convinced that a career in counselling was my passion. As a full-time first year student it was required that I select five courses and the first four were easy: Psychology, English, Philosophy and History. Politics became part of the mix through process of elimination – I was the least opposed to it as compared to any other option. By the end of first year, I had declared a major in Politics.

Upon reflection, it felt so necessary that I know exactly which path to pursue fresh from high school. Naturally, as an 18 year old I was fully equipped with all the necessary experience to reach some sort of informed decision about the direction of my life. Right? Wrong. In fact, fast forward to the end of my bachelor’s degree four years later: still bright eyed, still bushy tailed and absolutely certain that I was going to law school.

For about a year after completing my undergrad, I worked as a server in a local waterfront restaurant. Simultaneously, I studied for the LSAT and prepared several law school applications. Unfortunately (or, perhaps fortunately), my efforts were unsuccessful and now I found myself at a real crossroads. I felt slightly stagnant and that was uncomfortable. So, I began applying for different jobs in the hope that a career path would present itself. But, I was only applying for jobs that felt familiar or comfortable.

Looking back, my desire to grow and the action I took as a result – applying for “comfortable” jobs – were most certainly at odds. Luckily, the job I ultimately accepted was neither familiar nor comfortable.
About a year after completing my undergrad, I became an outside sales representative in the automotive and industrial sector. Let that sink in for a moment. Here was the girl who was going to counsel people for a living, and also the girl who was going to argue in courts of law for a living, and now she is cold calling on collision and mechanical repair shops and presenting products to customers? My life had definitely zigged and then zagged and then zigged again in the four years between ages 18 and 22. And you know what? Thank goodness for those zig zags.

Finally, I found my groove (well, at least for a short while). Let me tell you a bit about my daily responsibilities as a sales rep. The company I worked for has contracts with about 30 different manufacturers. I began by focusing on several of these product lines, and was directed to traverse the lower mainland stopping in at any business that might have a need. For the most part, these were automotive shops and supply stores, although once or twice I got creative and dropped by a winemaker’s store and a shipyard. At the beginning, before I had developed any sustained relationships with customers, I experienced many suspicious looks that culminated in “thanks, but no thanks” (and this was the nicest version of ‘no’ that I received). My repertoire of rejection only encouraged me, as this was a challenge I simply had to surmount. Eventually, with a little more experience and product knowledge, I was able to create a network. At this point, some sales calls were more akin to talking business with friends than trying not to sweat or blush as I nervously attempted to engage a new customer.

I cannot find the words to express how much fun I had with that first sales position. Nor can I find the words to express how much I learned, even in that very short span of time. Though, as much as I looked forward to work each day, another pinch of self-awareness was creeping up on me. I was experiencing the beginnings of a passion that would not have been possible at 18, or at 22. And I wanted to learn more! It began with a Professional Sales Certificate, completed through Langara College. Still, this was not enough. It was at this point I discovered the Master of Management program. I applied and this application process was very different from the law school application process. Yes, I still had to write a test (LSAT to GRE) and yes I still had to write some creative pieces as part of the application. But, I felt more certain, more committed, and definitely more passionate.

Following graduation, I want to work in a sales position once again. However, if there is one important lesson I have learned it’s that you really cannot ever be sure about where your personal path will lead. I know, very cliché. Also, I promise you, very true. So, craft a plan, follow a direction but always, always be open to the multitude of opportunities that are available. If you don’t feel sure, that’s ok – a little bit of uncertainty adds excitement. Capitalize on that uncertainty and allow it to open you to new experiences.

Stay healthy, my friends.

 

Written by Savana Caruk ’17

Don’t be a M.E.S.S: Meditate, Exercise, Snack, Sleep

How can I set a daily routine that allows me to feel and live better? The answer is M.E.S.S, a friendly reminder that we should routinely meditate, exercise, snack, and sleep.

MEDITATE: Meditation is an effective way to relax, relieve stress, and promote your personal well-being. It can include things such as relaxed yoga, personal reflection, prayer, and many other forms. Some practical times for meditation include:

Beginning of the day:

  • Prepare you for the upcoming events of the day
  • Allow you to focus on what is important
  • Re-align your thoughts with your purpose

End of the day:

  • Allow you to positively reflect on the events of the day
  • Rid your mind of stressful thoughts
  • Prepare your mind and body for a rejuvenating sleep

EXERCISE: The importance of exercise is old news. As stated by John F. Kennedy, “physical fitness is not only one of the most important keys to a healthy body, it is the basis of dynamic and creative intellectual activity.” With this in mind, we are most concerned about where, when, and how to exercise.

Where? Any location that fits your needs. If you have an open space in your house, a local gym, or a nearby field, then those are all great places to stay active. I would strongly recommend going outside where the locations and opportunities are endless.

When? Consistently. Add “exercise” to your daily agenda and stick to it. For me, I work out in the mornings. This helps me to feel vigilant all day and prevents me from fidgeting uncontrollably during long meetings.

How? Exercising can take many forms. My advice is to do something that you enjoy. Playing sports, walking your dog, hiking, and working out are all great ways to stay active. Exercise should not be a chore, it should be a time that you look forward to each day!

SNACK: Eating a healthy and consistent diet will make you feel physically better and enhance your mental awareness. Try to put emphasis on eating progressively throughout a day rather than sticking to 3 large meals. Fruit smoothies, vegetables, hard-boiled eggs, and nut-mix are all great snacks to munch on throughout the day. And remember to stay hydrated to keep your mind vigilant throughout the workday!

SLEEP: Set a consistent sleep routine and stick to it. It is most important that you wake up at the same time each day (although going to bed at the same time is beneficial, this is not as important). Different people require different amounts of sleep, but 7-8 hours is safe for most people. Furthermore, don’t be afraid to nap. A 10-20 minute power nap is a great way to increase mental alertness and feel energized without the need for coffee.

Remember to not be a M.E.S.S. Try to establish a consistent 24-hour routine that incorporates meditation, at least 30 minutes of exercise, proper eating habits, and a sufficient amount of sleep. If you treat your mind and body well then they too will return the favour.

Stay healthy, my friends.

 

Written by Ben Magnuson, VP Health & Wellness ’17

New Year Same Reality

It seems like every day there is a new headline highlighting the issues that our southern neighbors are facing after the US elections results. Social media has become a boxing ring between Trump supporters and non-supporters, each side delivering a blow that stings as much as the last. With an estimated 900,000 to 2 million US citizens living in Canada[i] we must recognize our position as a neighbor and declared ally to the US. We must also recognize that we are not innocent ourselves.

We have never elected a female Prime Minister, and our very nation has been built on cultural genocide. We cannot change the past, and it feels as though we may not be able to change the future as much as we had once thought…. Canada and the US are not quite as different as we like to think.

Even though I raise my hand in class every time one of our professors asks who is American, and every time I go unnoticed, I am in fact American…. AmeriCanadian if you’d please. Going back to the US and spending the break there was a strange mixture of holiday cheer and utter shock. Although the election hit me hard while up in the land of my mother, I was not prepared for the emotional edifice that I was to face coming back.

But, I am not going to make this post about my personal grief or stomach churning sensation I get every time the orange-faced you-know-what stands up as a representation of my country. In fact, it is actually difficult not to use the colorful-almost-made-up vocabulary I possess from my art history days to paint the portrait of a man who is so brilliantly portrayed on Saturday Night Live (if you have yet to see Alec Baldwin in his what I believe to be an Oscar worthy portrayal of the President Elect, click here).

I am angry, I am offended, I am disgusted, but I am also optimistic, I believe in the common good and common decency of humanity despite that every time I open the ‘news’ app on my iPhone it is constantly tested. I commend everyone I know who has used their position to speak out against what has happened, I know multiple people who have written letters, marched in protest, and have actively spoken out on every social media platform. I also know people, people I love and admire, who voted for Trump.

So after weeks of reflecting, fighting with people I don’t agree with, being flabbergasted by the reality of violence and hate in the US, and a complete emotional roller coaster over the month we had off… I want to share with all of you my New Year resolution…

TO LISTEN: We do not need to become angry and shut out those we disagree with. We need to listen, we need to lead through our actions, we must maintain the values and cultures of our workplaces, social circles, educational arenas. This coupled with actively raising our voices against the injustices that have been committed as those who have been waiting to unleash their pent-up intolerances think that power has just been handed to them, is the fight that is our responsibility to stand up in. Regardless of who you support or did not support, regardless if you are American or not, this election has affected people worldwide and has instilled a sense of fear of what is to come. The culture of fear is a funny thing; it can paralyze or mobilize.

So for 2017 I have decided to listen, to speak, and to show that despite any individual’s political alliance, Love Trumps Hate. We mustn’t allow fear of others’ political views to destroy who we are as individuals, and as a community. This is an opportunity to fight harder, push further, and demonstrate that as Americans & Canadians living in a multi-cultural world, we are not innocent, but we can take hold of our futures. Listening and acting is where we can start.

Stay healthy, my friends.

 

Written by Kristen Underwood, VP Events ’17

 

[1] http://www.walkingwithcake.com/?attachment_id=8011

[1] http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/hlt/97-562/pages/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo=PR&Code=01&Data=Count&Table=2&StartRec=1&Sort=3&Display=All&CSDFilter=5000

Do You Know What You Really Want From Your Life?

“Always be yourself, express yourself, have faith in yourself, do not go out and look for a successful personality and duplicate it.” – Bruce Lee, Philosopher, Martial Arts Instructor, Actor, Screenwriter, Producer

Whenever I hear the question “What is your main achievement?”, it always makes me reflect thoughtfully. I’m quite a self-rigorous individual, and I always try to set big goals. Although I have a lot of accomplishments I am proud of, I would like to share the story of a person who happened to change his life entirely.

About one and a half years ago, I landed at Toronto Pearson International Airport to have one of the happiest months in my life. I came to Canada to attend a short-term English Program at the University of Toronto, and that experience changed the way I looked at things. I met a lot of extraordinary people from all over the world, significantly improved my English proficiency, and developed a global perspective. I was a different person when I came back to Moscow, and although I was not completely sure of which path to choose, I was bound and determined to take the next step in my personal development journey.

At that time, I had a full-time job that was demanding and challenging enough to keep me engaged and motivated. However, I felt a strong desire to challenge myself even further and learn more. That was the reason why I started to consider pursuing a graduate degree in business.

At first glance, my decision to apply to the Master of Management Program seemed absolutely unrealistic. I was literally stunned with the huge amount of work I faced when beginning the application process. I had to considerably improve my proficiency in English. I had to spend months preparing for the GMAT – improving my quantitative as well as qualitative skills. I had to do a lot of other challenging things on my way to Sauder, but I never regret that. It was an experience that is worth getting through and that made me far stronger in every aspect of my life.

Today, I am happy and proud to be a student of unquestionably one of the most prestigious business schools in the world. This program has been transforming me since the very first day. It made me understand deeply what a real challenge and work looks and feels like. It let me collaborate with an amazingly diverse cohort of people from all around the world, and this experience fundamentally changed my understanding of things like commitment, reliability, teamwork, success, networking, personal and professional development.

Apart from the excellent business education, I learned to make the most of my inherent talent, interests, vision, and values. I still remember the first days of the program when we were frequently asked “What do you really want to do when you graduate?”. 90% of the class, including myself, could not confidently answer that question because we all came here to discover ourselves. Now, if you ask the same question, you will hear a completely different answer. And that is what this program is all about – answering questions that matter, and finding your own path to succeed and enjoy the journey we call life. I can confidently say that one of my greatest achievements is to be here, among these bright and intelligent people, and be a part of this experience. What about you? Are you ready to discover yourself?

– Jeremy Velichko

Business for Creatives

I took a different path than most of my cohort did to get to the MM program. I think that my story will help show one of the strengths of the MM program as well as hopefully inspire others to push their boundaries and try to gain new skills, so bear with me for a minute.

When I was a kid, I was never a big fan of school, especially anything that involved numbers. I spent a lot more time playing with cameras and computers than I actually spent paying attention in high school. For the most part, I took the easy route with a singular vision in mind – going to design school. After 3 years studying graphic design at MacEwan University in Edmonton, I graduated with a certificate and a diploma and immediately landed a fantastic internship as a designer in a construction company’s communications department. I’d never seen myself working in an office, but I quickly fell in love with it.

I knew that my new career goals would require more education than a diploma, so the following year I went to Royal Roads University in Victoria and completed my BA in Professional Communication. However, as I was completing my undergraduate degree I felt like something was missing. While I had gained a lot of great skills, I lacked the ability to quantify their value. I also lacked business acumen as well as knowledge of key areas such as commercial law and financial reporting.

I had never taken a single quantitative course in university. With increasingly high aspirations, I knew that I wanted, and needed, more. To make a long story short: I worked my butt off brushing up on my quantitative skills, wrote the GRE, and applied for the MM.

While I had some basic quantitative experience from investing as well as summer jobs in construction, starting the MM three weeks after finishing my undergraduate degree was daunting. The first period included courses in Economics, Statistics, and Financial Accounting. Looking back, I realize what a difficult job the professors had catering the material to a class that ranged from very little to heavy amounts of quantitative experience. One of the great things about the cohort model was that I’ve never been alone. I’ve constantly badgered my classmates for help in my weaker areas (thank you, if you’re reading this) and I was able to push through the courses. Plus, with the exception of a B- in Statistics, I’ve done very well.

Moving forward, I see endless possibilities for my creative background combined with my graduate business training. A lot of employers are seeking well-rounded individuals, which I can now certainly claim to be. While I don’t see myself becoming an accountant or a financial analyst, I have gained confidence and knowledge that helps me communicate with people from various areas of businesses. These skills have already proved invaluable in my conversations with potential employers.

The moral of my story is that you can earn an MM, whether you studied science or art. You can earn an MM even on the off chance that, like me, you haven’t taken a single quantitative undergraduate course. The MM is designed in a way that will help you succeed. All it takes is your dedication and a few late nights. Luckily, your cohort will be right there with you.

– Nick Larson

nicklarson.xyz

@NRWL

A Week in the Life Of..

When I was deciding whether or not I should apply to the program one of the major factors I considered was general lifestyle, in school and extra-curricular activities. It’s impossible to know exactly what you will be doing, feeling, and thinking, but I’ll give you my best possible simulation by providing you with a standard week in the MM program! Here is a fairly close approximation of what went down in my life as an MM student last week:

Mondays: Class starts at 10am on Monday mornings, so I was up at the crack of dawn. Before you go thinking I’m really active and productive it’s worth noting that the crack of dawn in January in Vancouver is approximately 8:30am, and that was still a struggle. Fortunately I live on campus so I need to leave home about 15 minutes before class starts. I piled on about 42 layers and left for class around 9:45am. There is a little coffee shop in the bottom of the Sauder School of Business, which I probably should have invested in at the start of the year as I faithfully drop $4.32 there several times a day for a latte. From here I trotted on up the stairs (by stairs I mean elevator) into my first class. I proceeded to learn and absorb like a keen little sponge until we finished up classes at the crack of dusk (4pm in Vancouver). From here I pranced on up to the Gold’s Gym in University Marketplace for a quick sweat, and proceeded back to my apartment to watch The Bachelor (Ben’s season, my bet’s on Lauren B for the win). I wrapped up my Monday evening with a few readings and by catching up on emails.

Tuesdays: These mornings class kicks off at 8am, so I have to forcibly remove myself from bed around 7am. From here I proceed to sprint around my flat like Usain Bolt attempting to get my life rapidly together because I accidentally hit my snooze button 4 times and it is now 7.30am. Fortunately I am then warmed up and able to power walk to Sauder without pulling a muscle and with time to spare for a coffee. More learning, more absorbing, more coffee and we are done classes for the day at noon. This leaves the afternoon free, but usually meetings, study dates, real dates for the hotties of the program (not me), and informational interviews fill up the spare time fairly quickly. This previous Tuesday I spent the afternoon finishing up an accounting assignment, meeting for a group project, chatting with friends in the MM lounge, and eating my body weight in chocolate almond Pockys.

Wednesdays: Class at 10am again, spent the extra two hours of my morning productively changing outfits 67 different times, because Vancouver weather is a challenge. I finally settled on the classic getup of head to toe waterproof wear. Up to Sauder I went, learnt, accounted, group meeting’d, ate Pocky and wrapped up the day at 4pm again. Fortunately I managed to finish off some other homework over our 2 hour lunch break so proceeded to head to the gym to prepare for another day of Pocky tomorrow.

Thursdays: This past Thursday was the most important day of everyone’s week (maybe even year) for the very serious reason being IT WAS MY BIRTHDAY!! Because of that I learnt and absorbed with a sparkly silver birthday hat on. Also I would like to mention that I only hit my snooze button 1 time on this morning because I matured into a together 22-year-old adult. After a quick meeting with our MM executive team to discuss class events, clubs, volunteer opportunities and career prospects I was taken out for a lovely evening of great food, drinks and laughs with some of my amazing friends in the program.

Fridays: If you don’t already know this I’m about to blow your mind, in the MM program WE DO NOT HAVE CLASSES ON FRIDAYS!! It’s a beautiful and kind gift that just keeps giving. I spent my most recent Friday in group meetings, running outdoors in the first break of rain in well over a week, and eventually going out for a class wide triple birthday celebration in the evening. Here we laughed and drank the night away, reminiscing of all the memories the weeks here in the MM have held.

Well this brief week outline may sound standard and seemingly unexciting, each day is also filled with plenty of laughter, plenty of learning, and (my personal favorite) plenty of classroom camaraderie. While the MM program delivers a plethora of information on all relevant aspects of business, it also delivers a plethora of friends as you spend the hours building memories to last a lifetime. The days go by faster and faster, and as we pass the halfway point of our short year together I look back on this collection of seemingly unexciting weeks with complete nostalgia. I look forward to what the rest of the program has to deliver, knowledge wise, Pocky wise, and friendship wise.

Note: Pocky did not sponsor this post.

– Renee Cadenhead

BLACK(M)MERLE

Courses you take during 9 months of the MM program are very intensive and challenging. However, these courses will definitely equip you with necessary tools that you would need in order to become a successful entrepreneur. Your learning experiences would be perfectly utilizable if you have some idea of your own venture before you come into the program or are even better when you have a business already. I can assure you of this because I am speaking from personal experience.

During my undergraduate years at Queen’s University, I majored in life sciences. Nonetheless, I knew that deep inside my heart the one thing that I was always passionate about was fashion. It is something that I have been putting my heart and soul into ever since my childhood. After graduating from Queen’s, I finally decided that I would start my own clothing brand, and to aid the process of building my own business, I applied to study management at UBC. After a lengthy but super enjoyable preparation, designing, sampling, and manufacturing process, BLACKMERLE (blackmerle.com) was officially launched on September 1st of 2015, which was the start of our MM program as well. 12625779_10153209303546059_821982769_nBeing a designer and starting your own fashion brand may look glamorous to some people but it is a really challenging venture and industry since there is a lot more business involved than what it seems like on the surface. Although I have taken care of all the beginning administration tasks and basic business side of the brand at this point, such as creating the online presence, marketing both online/offline, or making creative content, I was still faced with more tasks and strategic managing in order to move forward. Courses I have taken so far during the MM program and help from the Business Career Center have been guiding me and pushing me forward with my venture.

I have to admit that marketing is the biggest challenge in most start-up ventures. Marketing courses taught by Ann Stone and Yi Qian will definitely help you plan out and execute several important marketing tactics. Financial and managerial accounting gives you the important technique in tracking where all your precious investment is going and, more importantly, gives you the right mindset for dealing with cost, revenue, and profit. Real life case studies that you will be reading throughout the whole program give you great insight by analyzing other company’s mistakes and successes. Entrepreneurship class gives you some of the most direct advice you can utilize right away to build your own start-up. Lastly, resources and help from BCC are very precious since they can give you the most “tailored” advice. It is incredibly amazing opportunity when you can apply what you learn in the classroom right away into your own business. Concepts that might seem so abstract to some students are better understood when you can relate it to your own business.

You only live a short life. I always feel like there is not enough time. If you have a dream of building your own business empire, start now. Although it may be different from person to person, the MM program can help you gain some essential skills in order to achieve your entrepreneurial dream. As I always mumble to myself, “know thyself” and follow your heart.

–  Terry Shin

BLACKMERLE

A Vancouverite’s Perspective

You’ve already learned about the culturally bountiful cocktail that is this year’s MM cohort – with 15 different backgrounds to constantly peak our perspectives. We sync for many reasons, but one of our key commonalities is the draw towards beautiful Vancouver, BC. While we learn from each other in the safety of our UBC bubble, study breaks mark the opportunity to explore our surroundings.

You may have heard rumours that Vancouver is all beauty and no bustle. But as a native Vancouverite of 13 years, I’ve seen this city bloom into a thriving marvel that’s evolving constantly. With an international brigade by my side, this has given me the opportunity to relive the city through their eyes, and play local tourist myself.

SkatingWe’ve got a myriad of ever-changing & exciting activities, particularly under the glitz and glimmer of the holiday season. Downtown becomes a shimmering spectacle, with its central Robson Square transformed into a skating rink. So for Lady Canadiana, we strapped up our laces and embraced this new experience for many! After 3 months of mutual support through multiple learning curves, we knew we had each other’s backs (and bottoms) on this slippery ride.

And our international cohort plowed through beautifully! Little did we know, we had an Elvis Stojko in our midst in the form of the fashionista himself: Mr. Phaokan! The veterans went hand-in-hand with the rookies, and we were all embracing the ice dance before we knew it.

MarketOur skating success earned us some much-needed refuel, and the opportunity to visit another local hotspot: the Vancouver Christmas Market. This annual favorite is quintessential of the traditional German style, with every kind of yuletide grub available. A perfectly apt representation of our various cultural offerings, and one of my personal favorites. Not surprisingly, we finished the evening with bellyfuls of free samples, from kettle corn to sauerkraut, coco to vino.

But this is just a small dose of the city’s seasonal offerings. Rain or rain, you’re guaranteed to see Vancouverites out embracing our gorgeous surroundings and communal cultures alike. Our eagerness is authentic, as we crave to learn and experience our diverse landscape. From sea to sky, we’re an eclectic, effervescent bunch – always active, always in the moment.

– Sher Najafi

Personal Profile on Alex Perrin

A snapshot of Alex’s exchange to Melbourne, Australia

So, how I did I get here?

I was one of those high school students who were told they just HAD to be a doctor. It was my plan from the age of 15. Then I came to UBC for my undergrad in 2009 and realized that almost every other science student had the same plan. The competitive spirit was definitely challenging, but I was determined.

However, in my 3rd year I went on exchange to Melbourne, Australia and I learned some very important lessons. The main one I learned was that life is too short to not do what you love. I realized I had made decisions in the past based on pride and what other people expected of me. Coming back to Canada, I re-evaluated my options and decided I didn’t want to be a doctor. However, I still enjoyed biology and healthcare technology. I knew I loved managing people and I had some business experience that made me think about pursuing management further. I heard about the MM program at the start of my 4th year and I never looked back. After graduating with my BSc. in 2014, I started the MM program right away.

Having completed 3 months in the program, I can honestly say that I have no regrets. I feel I am exactly where I am supposed to be and I am learning on a daily basis. Since the MM program started, I have been challenged in many ways. I have had to learn how to interact and work with people on a daily basis; you can’t be anonymous at Sauder. At this point in the program, I feel like I have a better understanding of who I am, where I succeed or struggle, and how to push myself outside of my comfort zone. There is a lesson to be learned in each day.

I can’t wait to see what the New Year brings and how our cohort continues to develop.

– Alex Perrin

View Alex Perrin's LinkedIn profile View Alex Perrin’s profile

Who’s that chick?

Hi everyone!

It’s that time of the month again- blog post time. I struggled for a while to try and figure out what it was that I would talk about in this post. There are so many things still left to be said about this program and my experience with it. But how did it all begin?

Born and raised in Vancouver, I made the decision to go to UBC after turning down an offer to go to the Ivey school at the University of Western Ontario. I ended up majoring in Political Science, not for a career but for the knowledge and curiosity that the subject gave me. I loved my undergraduate experience, but it lacked the practical knowledge and skills I craved to find a career for myself.

I want to stress that I was never one of those kids who inherently knew what they wanted to be when they grew up (I’m pretty sure I wanted to be a pediatrician to teddy bears). I took aptitude testing time and time again to help me try to narrow down what it is I could be, but nothing really sunk in. The best part of this is that at UBC continuing studies, when I paid hundreds of dollars for career suggestions through testing, they came up with florist. Yes, the one career path that doesn’t require even a high school education was what they determined was right for me. Needless to say, I needed some help.

Enter the MM program- something I had become aware of in 3rd year. I ended up taking a year off between graduation and entering the MM program, but I don’t regret my decision for one second. This program has given me that confidence and self-awareness that I lacked a mere 9 months ago.

Who knows, maybe one day I’ll have a floral empire.
Until next time,

Julia Shepherd