Author Archives: Linda TM Pham

ImagineNATIVE

http://www.imaginenative.org/

ImagineNATIVE Film and Media Arts Festival is an international festival that celebrates the latest works by indigenous peoples on the forefront of innovation in film, video, radio, and new media. Each year in the fall, the festival presents some of the most compelling and distinctive Indigenous works from around the world. The festival attracts and connects film makers, media artisists, and other industry professionals. The works accept reflect the diversity of the worlds Indigenous nations.

ImagineNATIVE is committed to dispelling stereotypical notions of Indigenous peoples through diverse media presentations from within our communities, thereby contributing to a greater understanding by audiences of Indigenous artistic expression. A youth workshop is offered for Aboriginal youth to learn the basics of machine cinema. There are many other activities that youth can be involved in such as the ImagineNATIVE Youth Video Contest.

This website is interesting for those who would like to learn more about Indigenous film and art. There is an extensive archive that contains many videos and images from past events and festivals.

SAY Magazine: For and about Native Youth

http://www.saymag.com/canada/4-this.php

SAY Magazine claims to be the largest national magazine for and about Native youth. They state that there is a need for a magazine for Native youth because the aboriginal population in Canada is projected to increase three times faster than the non-Aboriginal population and Aboriginal youth will represent a much larger share of the youth population over the next decade. They will also account for an increasing share of entrants into the workforce. There is a section on technology on the SAY Magazine website. It presents a number of aboriginal individuals who speak about technology and how it has impacted their lives. Kirk Mann is a member of Peguis First Nation. He also works for Status Solutions. He mentions that technology is important for him in helping out in his community. Brian Bull is another aboriginal individual. He is from the Nez Perce Nation. While there are many other mediums out there, Bull remains dedicated to broadcast journalism because it most closely follows the time-honored custom of oral tradition. He also states that technology is helping many tribes of preserve their history through digital recordings and high-resolutiont scans. Lastly, Scott Grossman is a speaker coordinator from Native Nations Events. He talks about the importance and benefits of technology use in the process of producing conferences. They are able to speak to tribal leaders as well as government officials. If one subsribes to this magazine, access to many more articles can be obtained. This magazine is very useful for those who are conducting research on Aboriginal youth networks and exploring the more topics surrounding Aboriginal youth today.

Technology and Globalisation for Indigenous Youth

http://www.unesco.org/ccivs/New-SiteCCSVI/institutions/jpc-youth/youth-open-forum/Section_for_Youth/Resources_and_tools/Other_documents_on_youth/OXFAM_INTERNATIONAL_YOUTH_PARLIAMENT/Chapter3_Indigenous_Youth.pdf

This article, written by Jasmine Bruce, discusses the submissions made to the International Youth Parliament’s Youth Commission into Globalisation (IYP Commission) from Indigenous young people and organizations working with Indigenous youth around the world. It focuses on the impact that globalisation has on upon the rights of people rather than a specific issue. On page 87, the role technology in globalisation for Indigenous youth is discussed. It states that “globalisation has both driven and been driven by developments in communication technologies, yet access to these technologies is far from equitable”. Many Indigenous people do not necessarily reap the benefits of developments in technology. When Indigenous young people gain access to technology, the challenge is to give culturally-valid meaning to the use of new technologies. Unless Indigenous people are involved with implementing the integration of technology into their communities, the technology may work against other aspects of their indigenous cultures. The article states that like other aspects of globalisation, technological advancements represent a double-edged sword for Indigenous youth. The technology also opens opportunities for Indigenous youth in the technology and knowledge-based industries and fosters youth Indigenous employment. They can also use technology to raise awareness about Indigenous rights and to create global youth networks. This article is very useful for anyone who is doing research on the impact of technology on Indigenous youth. It presents technology as a positive and negative influence on Indigenous youth globally.

Wii Chiiwaakanak Learning Centre – Manitoba

http://www.aclmb.ca/FamilyInformation/Aboriginal_University.pdf

This document was found in the “Community Living Manitoba” website. It talks about he opening of the Wii Chiiwaakanak Learning Centre (University of Winnepeg) and how this will help bridge the digital divide and help Aboriginal students and community members with the opportunity to explore their past and navigate their future. This Wii Chiiwaakanak project will serve over 800 Aboriginak students at the University of Winnepeg. It will provide them the technology and resources to fully engage with their rich heritage and today’s realities. The centre’s largest funder is the RBC Financial Group in support of The RBC Community Learning Commons. Computer-based learning, mentoring, and urban distance education for Aboriginal children and adult learners is the prime focus of The RBC Community Learning Commons. They will help bridge the digital divide by providing access to and instructional support to computer technology for everyone in the local community. They will also help to nurture the next generation of computer confident literate learners. This document is useful and interesting for those who are doing research about Canadian organizations that have taken action to help Aboriginal communities close the digital divide gap.

Intertribal Times

http://www.intertribaltimes.com/

Intertribal Times is a website comprised of Native and Aboriginal headlines and editorial stories. One can view headlines from 4 different countries: Canada, United States, New Zealand, and Australia. Once one clicks on a headline, the website instantly forwards to the source of the article such as news websites and radio organizations. There also appears to be a discussion forum for people to share their opinions. The threads that I saw seem quite extensive as I am aware that there are so many headlines to discuss. The headlines are very up-to-date and include sources that I would deem reliabe. For Canada, the sources are CBC, the Globe and Mail, and other local newspapers. There is also an editorial section that is organized in chronological order. This website would be very useful for anyone wanting to research the latest news relating to Native and Aborginal communities in any of the 4 countries mentioned above. To comment on articles on Intertribal Times, one must create an account and sign in.

Internet Technology and First Nations Education

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1RUesqalw4&playnext=1&list=PL96F8DAA1B6BC9C71

This video shows Denise Williams talking about internet technology can strengthen First Nations education. Williams is a youth initiative officer for the First Nations Education Steering Committee. One question she was asked is “How would you like to see internet technology used in First Nations education over the coming years?

Williams mentions that there is hope of being able to use the internet to bridge the gap between the teachers that are available to teach and those subjects areas that are still  in need of instructors (such science, math, and physics). The internet can allow for learning activities that involve video conference and Skype. Williams also mentions that with the internet, there is also hope for sharing resources between teachers and communities.

Another question for Williams is “How does the digital divide manifest itself in First Nations schools in BC?” Williams answers by saying that the digital divide in a community sense is different than the divide in education. She says in education, the divide is in the experience of the student. For example, many First Nations students go to school where they experience mainly textbook based learning with limited access and experience with internet activities that could enhance and further their educational experience.

The third question asked is “How does internet technology improve education for First Nations students?” Williams explains that students who are going to schools with internet connectivity and IT have a different perspective on what is possible in the world. They realize that there are different ways in which they can get their education and that they do not neccessarily need to leave their community to gain education. They also have the opportunity to view the possible careers that they can have that would enable them to work from home (such as webdeveloping and art-related careers). With technology, First Nations youth are able to see many more possibilities out there in the world and explore, for themselves, who they can become.

This video is very inspiring as it talks about the benefits of internet technology to First Nations youth in British Columbia. It would be a useful resource for anyone looking to explore more about the digital divide in BC, as well as the effects of broadband connection in remote communities in BC.

AYM Team – Aboriginal Youth Media Team

http://aymteam.com/index.html

AYM is a British Columbia-based organization that promote and share 21st century literacy skills. They strive to provide youth-friendly training in a culturally-relevant learning environment. The youth can connect with elders, other Aboriginal youth groups, and business mentors. They also strive to promote the diversity of Indigenous languages, cultures, and the ways of knowing and teaching. AYM also claims to decolonize and “Youth-enize” curriculum by including youth and elder voices, Indigenous knowledge, and technology to create a unique and inclusive learning environment.

AYM like to bring in community partners, elders, professional facilitators and guest speakers to teach and co-teach with Aboriginal youth. They encourage youth to put their new skills to work in non-profit organizationa or local bands as writers, reporters, videographers, website designers, and workshop facilitators.

The 21st century literacy skills mentioned above include digital literacy (using various technologies), interpersonal skills (the Coast Salish tradition of witnessing events), cultural literacy skills (re-learning and rediscovering the diversities of indigenous cultural traditions. Learning these literacy skills means that Aboriginal youth will be able to professional create, publish, and promote their own stories, media messages, and art in their own voices and styles.

This organizations sounds like a wonderful resource for Aboriginal youth in the lower mainland of BC. There is easy access to podcasts, online articles, videos, stories, and surveys. AYM reminds me somewhat of Module 3s video where a group of youth traveled down the Fraser River to explore and learn about culture and heritage. This organization seems to be able to do the same with youth.

Aboriginal Youth and Internet Technologies

http://arago.cprost.sfu.ca/smith/research/fncr/Youth.pdf

This paper is written by the First Nations Connectivity research team at SFU. It discusses aboriginal youth and internet technologies and the issues affecting remote communities of British Columbia. The article puts emphasis on youth as the wealth and wellbeing of young people will directly shape the future of all British Columbians. This reminds me of Module 3 where the topic of aboriginal youth and cultural preservation were discussed.

Broadband connectivity can play an important role in these various youth programs, as it helps remote communities work together to tackle major problems. This article also connects a range of youth issues to broader Aboriginal movements in BC, in order to demomstrate the interconnectedness of broadband uses in remote communities. Developing the infrastructure and knowledge-base needed to fully exploit the internet’s potential is largely inseparable from grassroots Aboriginal movements and initiatives.

This article would be useful for someone who is interested in investigating technology use in remote communities in British Columbia. It would also be interesting for someone who is doing research on Aboriginal youth and the effects of technology on cultural preservation revitalization.

Using Technology to Preserve Native American Languages

http://www.research.vt.edu/resmag/sc98/lockee.html

This article discusses the ideas of Barbara Lockee of Virgina Tech. Lockee did her doctoral dissertation on using hypermedia to perpetuate Native American languages. Although a small percentage of Native American people are fluent in a native language, Lockee suggests that there is hope because many elders believe that maintenance of tribal cultures is dependent on young people’s learning to read, write, and speak their native languages. As part of her dissertation work, Lockee is developing a program to help teach Native Americans their original languages.

Lockee mentions the reasons for why Native Americans lost their languages. Influences such as residential school and moving to reservations heavily affected preservation of native languages. With the lack of ability to communicate to elders, native peoples have a hard time learning about the their culture and heritage.

Lockee discusses how non-urban Native Americans have different learning styles that they have acquired at home. This is something important to consider when implementing language programs with Native students. These progams also need to be relevent and involve the context of actual situations.

The progam that Lockee is creating provides an opportunity for the students to translate and even write their own stories at their own pace. It also promotes critical thinking skills instead of memorization of content. The students would also be allowed to work in pairs to encourage cooperative, inter-related type learning that suits their cultural styles. Although her program is created for the Cherokee language, different tribes can adapt the program by inserting their own legends and languages into the template.

I find this document to be very encouraging as I understand that many Aboriginal peoples in Canada are also concerned with the loss of their language and heritage. Because there are so many different tribes and languages involved, it would be challenging to find or create a program similar to that of Lockee’s to possibly accommodate native language revival in Canada. With the available technology today, it seems quite possible. However, there is a time limit as elders only get older and will no longer be available to aid in the language revival process.

NorthWest Indian News (NWIN)

http://www.nwin.tv/NWIN-Welcome.html

Northwest Indian New appears to be a very interesting website where one can access issues and events important to Indian people. The website claims to be a positive voice for Indian people and is currently being broadcasted into more than 50 million households throughout Canada and the United States. There are also plans to share NWIN programs with European and Asian audiences in the future. NWIN provides training and employment for tribal members in a non-traditional industry.

There is a section where one can access to watch all the episodes of NWIN. The latest episode available is number 44 from November, 2010. I am interested in searching for more current episodes but I am unsure of when they would be posted if at all. I watched a few of the most recent episodes and they are presented by a Tulalip Tribal member named Carissa Ramsey. She covered topics such as fisheries, the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver, events at local schools, The American Indian Film Festival, and Native art. There are several other reporters besides Ramsey. They use various locations to report news.

I am glad to see that all the reporters are of Aboriginal decent and are from tribes. I also looked at the credits section of the website and noticed that almost all individuals involved with NWIN are Aboriginal and their bands and tribes are also mentioned. This seems like a reliable website for Aboriginal peoples to acquire information of the latest news that affects Native people.