Author Archives: Will

UBC Senate Endorses Principles for Learning Materials Used for Assessment

At their May 2019 meeting, the UBC Senate endorsed principles for digital learning materials used for assessment. The principles attempt to address affordability of compulsory materials, student agency and support for open resources and platforms. The endorsement of the principles contribute to UBC’s continued strategic support for open resources.

Read the full principles at the Open UBC site.

Examples of Open Scholarship

Open Scholarship is an umbrella term that encompasses some of the commonalities found in open education, open research, open access publishing, etc. Here’s a list of some examples of open scholarship:

  • scholarly outputs such as educational resources, research findings, software, data, etc., made openly available and shared free of access barriers
  • application of open copyright licenses, such as Creative Commons or GNU gpl licenses, to encourage reuse of created outputs
  • use of existing open education resources, open source software, open data, or open platforms
  • transparency and openness in scholarly processes and practices (e.g. open pedagogies, research methods, course design or development processes, etc)
  • use of open access publishing, open code repositories, open scholarly or educational repositories to facilitate reuse
  • collaboration with students as scholarly partners who have agency to be creators or share their work openly
  • adoption of inclusive and accessible practices
  • involvement in open government initiatives
  • advocacy for open scholarship and open sharing of scholarly outputs and practices

Significant Use of Open Resources at UBC

In 2018, UBC published a new Strategic Plan that articulated the intention to expand the creation and dissemination of open educational resources as well as recognized the contributions that UBC faculty, student and staff have made in this area.

These contributions have had a significant impact: in academic year 2018, an estimated 15,388 students were impacted by courses using open resources in place of paid textbooks or readings. This replacement of traditional textbooks with open resources has potentially saved UBC students an estimated $1.5 to $2.3 million dollars this academic year. The wide diversity of UBC open education initiatives and efforts, from strong AMS advocacy and innovative instructor efforts to increased strategic support and funding, is helping to ensure that the adoption and use of open resources continues to be a significant practice at UBC.

Read my full report here…

Looking Ahead: 2019 Open Education Conferences

There’s a lot of great semi-local open education conferences in 2019 and I’ve started a list of them here:

2019 Open Education Related Conferences

CNIE

  • Website: https://cnie2019.arts.ubc.ca/
  • Conference Stream: Open Horizons: Open textbook, education, pedagogy and research
  • Conference Dates: May 21-24, 2019
  • Call for Proposals Deadline: December 15, 2018
  • Location: UBC-Vancouver

2019 Cascadia Open Education Summit (BCcampus)

ETUG 25th Anniversary

OpenCon Cascadia

OpenEd 2019



CC-BY button.png This resource is shared under a CC-BY 4.0 International License.

source: https://wiki.ubc.ca/List_of_2019_Open_Education_Conferences

Open Snippets

It looks like the 2018 AMS Academic Experience Survey (AES) has officially been published and one interesting finding is that 86% of undergrad respondents reported that they have used open educational resources in lieu of textbooks at least once.

The Ubyssey covers the expanding conversation around the affordability of learning materials, including the cost of online assessment materials, and mentions open educational resources as having a role to play in possible mitigation strategies.

Meanwhile, OpenCon 2018 will be in Toronto this year — OpenCon is an international open ed, open data, open access event for students and “early career” professionals. Interested folks have to apply to be able to attend as they attempt to “bring together a diverse, representative, and engaged group of participants, with travel scholarships available to most participants”.

Open as a TLEF Priority Focus

UBC-Vancouver’s Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund (TLEF) was created in 1991 to enrich student learning by supporting innovative and effective educational enhancements.

Starting in the 2017/2018 cycle, a priority focus on the development or integration of open educational resources (OER) was added to the criteria for new proposals. Furthermore, eligibility requirements were also added that specifically stated that funded projects are encouraged to openly license their developed materials under an appropriate Creative Commons license to allow for broad sharing within and beyond UBC.

Open UBC Image

Approximately 25% of the 2017/2018 TLEF funded projects had an explicit open strategy. In the 2018/2019 cycle, more than 39 percent of the TLEF funded projects incorporated strategies around open resources or practices.

The TLEF is Funded By Students

The TLEF is financed through a portion of the student tuition paid to UBC Vancouver. According to the 2016 AMS Student Experience Survey (pdf), nearly 75% of students have not bought a course text due to cost at least once and 37% reported. Access to educational materials is an important topic for students as they often or frequently go without textbooks or resources due to cost. Open educational resources and practices can help close those access barriers.

Examples of Open Education Projects Funded by the TLEF

Please visit the UBC TLEF site for a complete list of TLEF funded projects.

This post was adapted from the TLEF and Open Education Poster presented at the TLEF Showcase. The original poster can be downloaded here.

New to Me Resources: June 2017 Edition

Here’s a list of new (to me) open resources:

Institutional Support for OER

An emerging motivation for uptake of open education resources and practices at UBC is the increased presence of University policies and programs that support OER. The 2016/17 edition of the Guide to Reappointment, Promotion and Tenure Procedures at UBC (pdf) includes contributions to open educational resources and repositories as a possible criteria for evidence of educational leadership (p. 16, 19 & 51) for those instructors in the educational leadership stream. I believe that the inclusion of open resources and repositories in a promotion and tenure guideline is pretty unique at this point (although many institutions have open access policies).

Additionally, both the 2018 UBC-V Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund and the 2018/19 Aspire Teaching and Learning Fund at UBC have priority focus areas for the development or integration of open educational resources that are intended to be used in a course, multiple courses within a program, or across several programs. The 2018 TLEF call for Large TLEF proposals is now open and letters of intent are due July 14, 2017.