Who will own the robots?

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Illustration credit: Joost Swarte.

David Rotman’s three-part article series in the MIT Technology Review asks important questions about the effects of software and automation on the economy. Do you think that today’s rapid advances in artificial intelligence and automation foreshadow a future in which robots and software greatly reduce the need for human workers? Are we facing a future with increased disparity and inequality due to the commercialization of technological innovation? Will the rewards of new technologies go largely to the very richest, as has been the trend in recent decades?

Part I (June 12, 2013): How Technology Is Destroying Jobs
Part II (Oct 14, 2014): Technology and Inequality
Part III (June 16, 2015): Who Will Own the Robots?

How do you respond to Robert Solow’s claim that, “any decent person should find having extreme poverty coexisting in the same society with extreme wealth immoral” in regards to the increasing gap between the super wealthy and everyone else in our world?

For example, the 2014 Global Wealth Report informs: “a person needs only USD 3,650 to be among the wealthiest half of world citizens. However, more than USD 77,000 is required to be a member of the top 10% of global wealth holders, and USD 798,000 to belong to the top 1%. Taken together, the bottom half of the global population own less than 1% of total wealth. In sharp contrast, the richest decile hold 87% of the world’s wealth, and the top percentile alone account for 48.2% of global assets.”

We need to do better at intelligently managing and sharing our world’s resources. How does income inequality effect economic opportunity and innovation in our world? How do we share the wealth that technology creates? How do we create a technological world without greed? How do we work towards a prosperous technological future with human flourishing for all?

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Upcoming Workshop: Technology Education for All

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The bad news: tech classrooms lack gender diversity.
The good news: we know how to change this!

Join Paula MacDowell for a workshop that emphasizes the importance of collaborating to build a diverse technology-literate society. We will explore strategies for working together to:
* increase non-traditional enrolment
* create non-stigmatizing learning environments
* design inclusive classrooms that meet learners’ needs

Questions:
1. Why is it important to increase participation of minority groups (i.e., gender, race, class, technical ability, and sexual orientation) in technology education classes and programs?
2. Have you observed or experienced a gendering of school subjects?
3. Who or what gave you the most support in your decision to become a technology education teacher?
4. How do we challenge the persistence of gendered learning myths (or “dinosaur discourses”) in technical education contexts (Paule, 2015)?
5. What can be done to improve the enrolment of diverse students in technology education classes during elementary, secondary, and post-secondary schooling?
6. How might we recruit and retain more females into careers as technology education teachers and professors of technology teacher education?
7. How can you make inclusion possible in your classroom (with respect for human dignity and the environment)?
8. How should we shape the future of technology education for all?

Resources:
Ashcraft, C., DuBow, W., Eger, E., Blithe, S. & Sevier, B. (2013). Male Advocates and Allies: Promoting Gender Diversity in Technology Workplaces. Boulder, CO: National Center for Women & Information Technology.
Online: www.ncwit.org/maleadvocateindustry

Fenwick T (2004) What happens to the girls? Gender, work and learning in Canada’s ‘new economy’, Gender and Education, 16(2), pp. 169-185.
Online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09540250310001690564

Flowers, J. (1995). Women in technology: Increasing the number of female teachers and students. WEPAN National Conference Proceedings: Women in Engineering ProActive Network, June 4-6, Washington, DC.
Online: https://journals.psu.edu/wepan/article/viewFile/57792/57480

Gray, M., & Daugherty, M. (2004). Factors that influence students to enroll in technology education programs. Journal of Technology Education, 15(2), 5-19.
Online: http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JTE/v15n2/gray.html

National Institute for Women in Trades, Technology & Science (Donna Milgram)
Online resource and forum for women in technology and trade careers to network with other women technicians and/or employers, including: job listings, e-mentoring, biographies of women role models, and WomenTechTalk an email discussion group.

Paule, M. (2015) Dinosaur discourses: Taking stock of gendered learning myths. Gender and Education, 27(7), 744-758.
Onine: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09540253.2015.1093101

Pullman, A. (2015). Emancipation, marketisation, and social protection: The female subject within vocational training policy in Canada, 1960–1990, Gender and Education, 27(7), 759-775.
Online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09540253.2015.1103840

Ritz, J. M. (2009). A new generation of goals for technology education. Journal of Technology Education, 20(2), 50-64.
Online: https://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JTE/v20n2/pdf/ritz.pdf

Shannon, L. (2016). Want to encourage gender diversity? Choose your words WISEly. Computing Research News, 28(5), 7-9.
Online: http://cra.org/crn/2016/05/gender-diversity

Keeping Up with the Media

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Keeping Up with the Media is a media study guide created for teachers and students, by teachers. The authors are all practicing teachers (elementary and secondary) completing a Master of Education in Digital Learning and Curriculum at UBC. This elite team produced this guide to enhance media literacy and media education across the K-12 curriculum.

Authors: #UBCDLC3
Editor: Paula MacDowell
Publication Date: August 4, 2016
Format: Interactive, multi-touch eBook
Online: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1149612619

Facing History Together

Teachers, here’s a powerful opportunity to engage your students in a shared mission of creating a better future with human flourishing for all. Face the Future: A game for social change.

Set in the year 2026, the game imagines the future of empathy and social change. It explores how new technologies may make it possible for us to *literally* feel each others’ feelings as if they were our own. If you are a middle-years or high school teacher, please sign up for more information and please SHARE THIS WITH YOUR NETWORK! The online game will take place November 13–14, 2016.

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#CreateNoHate #‎NoH8‬

Create No Hate, a powerful anti-cyberbullying video made by 13-year-old filmmaker/vlogger Luke Culhane ‪

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MAKE

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As Solnit (2013) shares in in The Faraway Nearby, “to become a maker is to make the world for others, not only the material world but the world of ideas that rules over the material world, the dreams we dream and inhabit together.”

What are you making? What are you sharing? What’s your story?

MAKE: Creativity & Learning in a New Tonality is a collection of creative and intellectual works (artifacts, stories, poetry, photography, ethnodrama, and research) by a team of teachers engaged in the art of making meaning together. We welcome you to join us in our journey, “let us take what we have learned from our courses and from each other and fly on eagles’ wings to (s)p(l)aces beyond our imagination” (Stuart, 2016).

Authors: EDCP 508 Collective
Editor: Paula MacDowell
Publication Date: March 13, 2016
Format: Interactive, multi-touch eBook
Online: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1093003369

Law & Cyberbullying

<reddit.com/r/vancouver> <the power of reddit>

Dr. Alec Couros AMA (ask me anything) on Reddit re: his experiences with the cat fishing scams <I received a call yesterday, but nobody spoke> <info for romance scam victims>

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What are the root causes of cyberbullying? How do teens react to cyberbullying? What is the role of social media in fostering youth civic engagement and digital citizenship? What are the challenges as youth develop their identities and social relationships both on and offline? <Amanda Todd>

How should teachers react to videos depicting local teen violence? How can teachers empower their students to deal with bullies constructively? When should parents get involved? What is the role of law (e.g., we can’t criminalize those we should protect)? <CTV Vancouver News, Feb 2, 2016>

Have you ever been bullied in your personal or work life? Where you ever the bully? Do you have any stories to share about cyberbullying in your school?<Academic Bullying & Mobbing>

As Shariff (2015) asks, how do we (educators, parents, policy makers, and the legal community) develop create ways to facilitate the growth of digitally empowered children and young adults? What are your recommendations for the development of safe school environments and anti-oppression education (e.g. teacher education in legal, digital, and media literacy; engage youth in policy development; educate the news media; sensitivity training for law enforcement personnel; updates to existing legislation in the Youth Criminal Justice Act)?

How might we strengthen Canada’s laws against cyberbullying? What are the challenges of the WITS (Walk Away, Ignore, Talk it Out, and Seek Help) program that the Canadian government is promoting to reduce cyberbullying?

According to Canadian Law, can children be deemed child pornographers when sexting non-consensual intimate images? What are the negative long and short-term consequences of criminalizing young people?

What are the public’s rights to open courts and press freedoms? Without the ability to pursue legal actions anonymously, will bullied children feel safe to pursue legal action to protect themselves (without fear of revictimization)?

Dr. Jennifer Fraser <why we must refuse to submit to bullying>
Abuse of Power <Teaching Tolerance>
Are you a responsible digital citizen? <A Bullying Story> <Digizen Game>

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Cyberbullying and cybercrime in the recent news

Former teacher sentenced after secretly videoing students (Feb 2, 2016)
Sentencing delayed, more charges considered for Moncton man who allegedly lured 2,000 boys (Feb 1, 2016)
B.C. parents convicted of assault for spanking teen who sent nude photos on Snapchat (Jan 29, 2016)
18-year-old Wyatt Kuran charged for threatening Winnipeg school (Jan 29, 2016)
13 men arraigned in Montreal on charges of child pornography (Jan 28, 2016)
Uxbridge, Ont. teacher among victims in deadly Saskatchewan shooting (Jan 23, 2016)
3 Alberta teens charged for sharing intimate images of high school students (Dec 8, 2015)
Roughriders team up with Red Cross to tackle bullying (Jan 30, 2016)
Threats on teacher (Jan 25, 2016)
Montreal school board forced to pay after bullying, sexual harassment case (Jan 18, 2016)
Six online ‘ugly girls’ polls span Newfoundland and Labrador (Jan 11, 2016)
Here’s the email that shut down all Los Angeles public schools (Dec 17, 2016)
Texas Sikh student, 12, arrested on terrorism charge after ‘bully’ reports bomb (Dec 18, 2015)
Nova Scotia’s Supreme Court strikes down cyber-bullying law (Dec 11, 2016)
Anonymous ‘After School’ app sparking cyberbullying concerns in U.S. schools (Dec 10, 2016)
Newfoundland teen named in ‘ugliest girl’ poll takes on online bullies (Dec 3, 2016)
Edmonton police remind sexters: ‘Without consent, it’s not sent’ (Nov 25, 2016)
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Hactivism

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Aaron Swartz: hacktivist, genius, martyr, leader in the charge for information to be free, victim of the rights and freedoms for which he stood

The Internet’s Own Boy: “The story of programming prodigy and information activist Aaron Swartz. From Swartz’s help in development of the basic internet protocol RSS to his co-founding of Reddit, his fingerprints are all over the internet. But it was Swartz’s groundbreaking work in social justice and political organizing combined with his aggressive approach to information access that ensnared him in a two year legal battle with the Federal government. It was a battle that ended with the taking of his own life at the age of 26. Aaron’s story touched a nerve with people far beyond the online communities in which he was a celebrity. This film is a personal story about what we lose when we are tone deaf about technology and its relationship to our civil liberties” (iTunes, 2014).

Take Action: sign the petition for greater accountability and better oversight for Federal Attorney misconduct

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Computer coding added to BC’s K-12 curriculum

At the inaugural BC Tech Summit, Christy Clark,the Premier of British Columbia announced that computer coding will be added to the province’s K-12 school curriculum:
Opening Keynote
www.cbc.ca
www.vancitybuzz.com
www.techvibes.com
www.theglobeandmail.com
www.thestar.com

What are some of the difficult questions concerning BC’s new tech strategy, including: teacher training, backend support, equitable funding for classroom technologies, and the need for government accountability?

What are the complex ethical, technical, and pedagogical issues associated with the development and implementation of BC’s new ADST framework?

How is technology changing the way children think, learn, and focus in school?

How might we increase student voice and choice in the development of new curriculum? For example, consider ISTE (International Society for Technology Education): Student FeedbackStandards for Students (7 Standards; 28 Performance Indicators).

BCIC (British Columbia Innovation Council)

Scratch Coding Curriculum Guide (draft by the Scratch Ed Team)

Computational Thinking (Wing, 2006)

Big ideas on British Columbia’s redesigned curriculum

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Bringing classroom learning to life through VR

How might educational VR experiences be designed to create powerful, accessible, and personal learning opportunities in K-12 classrooms?

Introducing Oculus Medium a virtual sculpting tool that allows you to access various sculpting tools and manipulate clay-like material into different sizes, shapes, textures, and colors to magically create anything you can imagine. Users can easily interact/create together and share their creative process with other people in the same virtual environment.

Introducing Microsoft HoloLens where VR technology becomes more personal and can adapt to the ways humans communicate, learn, and create. Holograms can improve the way we do everyday activities, and enable us to do things we’ve never done before. For education, HoloLens can help to make incredible leaps forward in productivity, collaboration, and innovation. See how VR transforms the way Case Western Reserve University teaches anatomy and transforms our understanding of the human body. Watch as 30 high school girls try out the HoloLens device during a Holographic Academy developer education session at DigiGirlz, a Microsoft YouthSpark program that helps girls and young women learn about careers in technology.

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Why do makerspaces matter?

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Fleming, L. (2015). Worlds of Making: Best Practices for Establishing a Makerspace for Your School. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

SchoolingVSMaking
Contrasts in Educational Stance by Gary S. Stager, Ph.D.co-author of Invent To Learn – Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom

Pop-Up Classroom Makerspaces

“All children deserve opportunities to be the creators of the media and technology that create our world, as well as to take part in changing who controls, owns, and shapes our future” (MacDowell, 2016)

Download Apps:
Google Cardboard
Jakku Spy

Maker Education Activities:
1) Osmo
2) Autodesk 123D
3) Squishy Circuits [activities] [projects]
4) Before I die I want to…[images]
5) Toys from the Trash
6) Google Cardboard VR [DIY headset] [buy it#1] [buy it#2]
7) Makey Makey

RockyVR

Critique of #Media & #Technology Workshop #mediastudies #history

CRITIQUE OF MEDIA & TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP 

Wednesday, April 29, 2015
10:20-12:00     Scarfe 1209
Year of Research in Education event #yreubc

CRITIQUE OF MEDIA & TECHNOLOGY

Stephen Petrina
University of British Columbia

This workshop focuses on the Critique of Media & Technology. The first part of the workshop includes a presentation and discussion on a forthcoming chapter. The second part of the workshop focuses on the process of researching and writing with special attention to philosophical and historical research 2.0 and narrative. How can we or ought we write a (big) history of the critique of media and technology?

The chapter begins with the spiritual critique of media and technology and proceeds historically through cultural criticism and social, psychic, ontic, and identic critiques. Differentiated from the spiritual critique that precedes, cultural criticism of media and technology emerges in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries as a mode of describing and depicting the mechanical arts. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, spiritual critique is displaced through a rejection of religion and theology as sources of modern authority. With spiritual ground undermined, social, psychic, ontic, and identic critics of media and technology compete for defensible ground for leverage. The history of critique is a search for ground. This chapter historicizes the critique of media and technology as well as critique as a practice that has run out of steam. “Critical distance” from or “free relation” to media and technology— a seductive orientation since the 1940s— has been instrumental in critique’s gradual decline. The critique of critique has quickened the decline. The conclusion questions the short-term future of machinic critique and long-term renewal of spiritual critique.

Download the Critique of Media & Technology chapter.

Gunmen attack French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris #freespeech #mediaed

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Stefan Constantinescu, Quartz, January 7, 2014–Three gunmen stormed the offices of a French satirical magazine called Charlie Hebdo around lunchtime on Wednesday (Jan. 7), brandishing AK-47s and a rocket launcher. The assailants killed 12 people and wounded five others. Among those dead are the magazine’s publisher, Stéphane Charbonnier; three cartoonists: Jean Cabut, Georges Wolinski, and Bernard Verlhac; and writer and economist Bernard Maris. Gérard Biard, the magazine’s editor-in-chief, was in London at the time.

Bernard Cazeneuve, the country’s interior minister, says the country is now on high alert and that his main goal is “to neutralize these three criminals who have committed this barbaric act”. President François Hollande has condemned the attacks, calling them “an exceptional act of barbarism”, and that France needs to “show we are a united country” by being “firm and strong”. German chancellor Angela Merkel echoed similar sentiments, saying today was an “attack on freedom of speech and the press, core elements of our free democratic culture. In no way can this be justified.”

Charlie Hebdo is no stranger to controversy. The magazine, started in 1969, drew ire in 2006 (link in French) for republishing cartoons of the prophet Mohammed that had appeared previously in Norways Jyllands-Posten. In 2011 it was firebombed (paywall) after publishing a issue purportedly “guest edited” by the prophet and entitled “Sharia Hebdo.” One year later it published more cartoons, prompting France to close embassies and schools in 20 different countries.