Tag Archives: online reviews

Do Incentivized Reviews Poison the Well? Evidence from a Natural Experiment at Amazon.com

Park, Jaecheol, Arslan Aziz, Gene Moo Lee (2021) “Do Incentivized Reviews Poison the Well? Evidence from a Natural Experiment at Amazon.comWorking Paper.

  • Presentations: UBC (2021), WISE (2021)

The rapid growth in e-commerce has led to a concomitant increase in consumer’s reliance on digital word-of-mouth to inform their choices. As such, there is an increasing incentive for sellers to solicit reviews for their products. Recent studies have examined the direct effect of receiving incentives or introducing incentive policy on review writing behavior. However, since incentivized reviews are often only a small proportion of the overall reviews on a platform, it is important to understand how their presence on the platform has spillover effects on the unincentivized reviews which are often in the majority. Using a natural experiment caused by a policy change, a ban on the incentivized reviews, on Amazon.com in October 2016, we conducted the difference-in-differences analyses for three different periods after the policy implementation. Our results suggest that there are positive spillover effects on the review sentiment, length, helpfulness, and frequency, suggesting that the policy stimulates more reviews in the short-run, and more positive, longer, and more helpful reviews in the long run.

On the Spillover Effects of Online Product Reviews on Purchases: Evidence from Clickstream Data (ISR 2021)

Kwark, Young.*, Gene Moo Lee*, Paul A. Pavlou*, Liangfei Qiu* (2021) “On the Spillover Effects of Online Product Reviews on Purchases: Evidence from Clickstream Data“. Information Systems Research 32(3): 895-913. (* equal contribution)

  • Data awarded by Wharton Consumer Analytics Initiative
  • Presented in WCBI (Snowbird, UT 2015), KMIS (Busan, Korea 2016), Minnesota (2016), ICIS (Dublin, Ireland 2016), Boston Univ. (2017), HEC Paris (2017), and Korea Univ. (2018)
  • An earlier version was published in ICIS 2016
  • Research assistants: Bolat Khojayev, Raymond Situ

We study the spillover effects of the online reviews of other covisited products on the purchases of a focal product using clickstream data from a large retailer. The proposed spillover effects are moderated by (a) whether the related (covisited) products are complementary or substitutive, (b) the choice of media channel (mobile or personal computer (PC)) used, (c) whether the related products are from the same or a different brand, (d) consumer experience, and (e) the variance of the review ratings. To identify complementary and substitutive products, we develop supervised machine-learning models based on product characteristics, such as product category and brand, and novel text-based similarity measures. We train and validate the machine-learning models using product pair labels from Amazon Mechanical Turk. Our results show that the mean rating of substitutive (complementary) products has a negative (positive) effect on purchasing of the focal product. Interestingly, the magnitude of the spillover effects of the mean ratings of covisited (substitutive and complementary) products is significantly larger than the effects on the focal product, especially for complementary products. The spillover effect of ratings is stronger for consumers who use mobile devices versus PCs. We find the negative effect of the mean ratings of substitutive products across different brands on purchasing of a focal product to be significantly higher than within the same brand. Lastly, the effect of the mean ratings is stronger for less experienced consumers and for ratings with lower variance. We discuss implications on leveraging the spillover effect of the online product reviews of related products to encourage online purchases.