Author Archives: Julian Dierkes

False Dzud Alarms

By Julian Dierkes Periodically, parts of the Mongolian countryside experience heavy snowfall at the end of a long, cold winter. These conditions combine to deny animals access to any kind of grass under the masses of snow when they are … Continue reading

Posted in Countryside, Grassland, Health, Policy | Tagged | Leave a comment

Risking Foreign Relations out of (Partisan) Pettiness

By Julian Dierkes November is shaping up to be a very busy month of diplomacy across Asia, at least from a North American perspective. It is an odd time for the Mongolian president to seemingly hold some of Mongolia’s most … Continue reading

Posted in Canada, Foreign Policy, Germany, Japan, Mongolia and ..., Security Apparatus, South Korea, United States | Tagged | Leave a comment

New to Ulaanbaatar October 2017

By Julian Dierkes I’ve been keeping a list of things that are arriving to/disappearing from central Ulaanbaatar: June 2017 | May 2016 | December 2015 | May 2015 | May 2014 | October 2013. More informal versions of these observations also appear in the /ulaanbaatar/change/ category. I’ve copied the 2014-16 … Continue reading

Posted in Change, Curios, Ulaanbaatar | Tagged | Leave a comment

Guest Post: Five Reasons Why Democracy in Mongolia is Working

By Daniel Schmücking and Adiyasuren J Mongolia is hailed as an ‘oasis of democracy’, as a shining example of democratic development, and as a model for other post-communist countries especially the Central Asian nations to strive to. Although, many challenges such … Continue reading

Posted in Adiya Jamiyandagva, Civil Society, Constitution, Daniel Schmücking, Democracy, Development, Foreign Policy, Global Indices, Governance, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Media and Press | Leave a comment

Pedagogical Reflections: Role Playing and Cases

By Julian Dierkes Beyond my research on Mongolia, I also seek out opportunities for teaching and other kinds of engagement. Overall, Mongolian teaching methods I have observed remain fairly traditional, that is a respected instructor lecturing a large audience of … Continue reading

Posted in Development, Education, Public Policy, Youth | Tagged | Leave a comment

Change in Countryside – October 2017

By Julian Dierkes This is Post #500 for our Blog! What a milestone, we’ll have to commemorate our achievement soon. For some years, I have now taken notes about visible changes in Ulaanbaatar on my periodic visits. This year, I’ve … Continue reading

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Disappointed by the Khurelsukh Cabinet

By Julian Dierkes My dominant view of developments in Mongolia is, “If only…”. The economic, political and social development promise is there, yet its fulfillment is always one or two good decisions away. In my view, Khurelsukh’s cabinet unfortunately signals … Continue reading

Posted in Judiciary, Mongolian People's Party, Politics, Public Service | Tagged | Leave a comment

Khurelsukh Cabinet

By J Mendee & Julian Dierkes It has been an odd development that the MPP government led by Prime Minister J Erdenebat fell, even though the MPP still has its super-majority in parliament. Ultimately, this has been fallout from M … Continue reading

Posted in Mongolian People's Party, Party Politics, Politics | Tagged | Leave a comment

Guest Post: Resource Governance Index Points to SOEs as Key Reform Target  

By N Dorjdari NRGI’s Resource Governance Index measures good governance in the extractives sectors of 81 countries. This year, Mongolia’s mining sector ranked 15th out of 89 assessed extractive sectors, with an overall score of 64 out of 100 points—a … Continue reading

Posted in Dorjdari Namkhaijantsan, Global Indices, Mining, Mining, Mining Governance | Leave a comment

Prime Minister-in-spe Khurelsukh

U Khurelsukh will be elected prime minister. His term will be focused on domestic politics. Within the constraints of the IMF agreement, Khurelsukh will try to dampen perceptions of cutbacks in state benefits, while hoping for a continuation (or resumption, given the past month) of the rise of copper prices to bring revenues to the government that might increase his ability to shape policy more actively.
Who is Khurelsukh? Continue reading

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Norwegian Wealth

By Julian Dierkes One of my all-time favourite authors is 村上春樹. He rose to fame initially with his book, Norwegian Wood (ノルウェイの森). That was a reference to a Beatles song, of course. And thus the title of this post, combining literature, … Continue reading

Posted in Corruption, Democracy, Development, EITI, Governance, Mining, Mining Governance, Policy, Politics, Public Policy, Public Service, Sovereign Wealth Fund | 1 Comment

How We Covered the Presidential Election

By Julian Dierkes It’s been an exhausting but exhilarating summer, Mongolia’s election season. I tried – together with a number of students – to provide observations, interpretations and analyses of the campaigns and both rounds of voting. I reported on … Continue reading

Posted in Presidential 2017 | Tagged | 2 Comments

Mongolian Presence in Germany

By Julian Dierkes I spent the past year on a research leave from the University of British Columbia in Berlin, Germany, at the Free University’s Graduate School of East Asian Studies. I found Mongolia to be much more visible in … Continue reading

Posted in Canada, Cinema, Curios, Diaspora, Germany, Mongolian Diaspora, Pop Culture | Tagged | Leave a comment

Guest Post: Beyond the Ballot – Mongolia’s General Election Commission

By Jessica Keegan Mongolia’s General Election Commission (GEC) has been in existence since 1992 and is responsible for administering free, fair and credible elections. As with any young democracy, the institution has at times struggled to keep up with Mongolia’s … Continue reading

Posted in Elections, Jessica Keegan, Presidential 2017, Public Opinion, Public Service | Leave a comment

Guest Post: Missing at the Kazakh Expo Party

By Dénes Jäger The Vatican, Yemen, Antigua and Barbuda are only three of over 100 states participating in this year‘s Expo in Astana Kazakhstan. Even though the concept of an international exposition seems to be a little outdated in a … Continue reading

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